{{previous post in sequence}}


brin-bellway:

https://brin-bellway.dreamwidth.org/106766.html

@rustingbridges​ replied: “how expired are expired filters anyway. what causes them to go bad

I’m not sure.

[…]

Some googling *suggests* that shelf lives for particulate filters are mostly a legal fiction, with a side of “the longer it sits around, the more opportunities for it to get physically damaged without you noticing”. Gas filters have a finite capacity to absorb gas which is eventually used up even just with normal traces of stuff in the air (I’ve noticed that the added nuisance-vapour filtration in my P100s stops working after 3 – 4 months of use), which vastly broadens the scope of possible “physical damage you didn’t notice” (a pinhole in the formerly-airtight packaging might do it). (Also gas filters fail open, so using a gas filter you falsely believed to have capacity left in it could severely fuck you over depending on how toxic the gas is.)

I wouldn’t want to bet my health on it, especially since 20 USD for [a primary set + a spare set] every few years is pretty cheap. But I think I’d take a ten-year-old P100 over a cloth mask, if those were my options.

For disposables, the main problem seems to be the nosepiece and edging, which break down and deform over time and make it harder to seal the respirator properly.

(For the record, I’ve been replacing my filters every four months or so when I can smell the ethylene or whatever the fuck it is stinking up the walk-in refrigerator at work (I assume nobody else has noticed it because for them it’s being drowned out by the particulate scents), but keeping all of the old filters in their original boxes (which have opening dates Sharpied on them) on a shelf in my bedroom. *Germs* don’t clog filters, but *smoke* does: if–and I would not be remotely surprised if this happens, with the way the world’s been going [link]–I find myself dealing with smoky air on a scale of months with a rickety-at-best supply chain, I may be glad to have those filters on hand.))


Tags:

#replies #101 Uses for Infrastructureless Computers #illness tw? #poison cw? #apocalypse cw?

{{previous post in sequence}}


brin-bellway:

https://brin-bellway.dreamwidth.org/101182.html

@rustingbridges replied:

https://k-kaze.jp/

I do not know if it is the common term but he didn’t just make it

up

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22%E5%BF%83%E3%81%AE%E9%A2%A8%22

Yeah, I did later find a mental-health clinic using it [link]. Said clinic’s stance is that depression *is* much more common than it used to be, but that this is because of the stress of a rapidly changing society.


Tags:

#replies #depression #language


{{next post in sequence}}

{{previous post in sequence}}


brin-bellway:

brin-bellway:

https://brin-bellway.dreamwidth.org/89538.html

@rustingbridges replied:

tomatoes really don’t travel well

they’re one of the fruits where the supermarket variety is the supermarket variety because it survives the trip, not because they’re good

meanwhile tomato plants are really low effort. if you have favorable conditions you can do literally nothing

Where are you *finding* conditions that aren’t full of weeds and wildlife-competing-with-you-for-the-food and the occasional blight? A greenhouse?

(…actually, that might not be a bad idea. I *have* heard of people building little personal greenhouses in their backyards, and nothing keeps squirrels from taking one bite out of your mom’s tomato and walking away like a fucking *door*, right?)

Re: surviving the trip, home-grown zucchinis taste about the same but we’ve noticed the shelf life is *vastly* longer. Store-bought zucchinis start to shrivel up and go soft within a few days of bringing them home; home-grown zucchinis can sit in the fridge for several *weeks*. Makes it a lot easier to plan your meals.

Honestly, probably a good part of my problem with gardening is that, because *Mom* loves home-grown tomatoes for some fucking reason, they end up the focal point of the garden and a great deal of my gardening-related labour is thoroughly alienated: I never see the fruits *or* the vegetables of my labour.

A garden optimised for what *I* thought was most worth growing would have zero tomatoes and more garlic and zucchini, with perhaps just enough potatoes to keep in practice so that I can put potatoes in the victory garden. And probably more perennials like mulberries. And possibly mushrooms. And I would want to do a bunch of research and expert-consultation regarding which weeds are secretly edible, since anything *that* easy to grow sounds like something I should take advantage of.

(I’ve been meaning to do some more digging into how to eat dandelions. I’ve heard you can put the new greens in salads and the petals in pancake batter, but I don’t normally eat salads *or* pancakes. Can you just, like, munch on a raw dandelion flower straight-up? Can I fulfil my childhood dream of eating a pretty flower I found in the backyard?)

@larshuluk replied:

Yeah, you can just munch any part of dandelion – I often do that when I’m reading in the garden. Older leaves get bitter and shouldn’t be eaten in big amounts, and roots need cooking. Flower is just fine though.

Hell yeah!

This is another area where I like a lot of the things the communing-with-nature people are putting out but for completely different reasons. I want to know more about the natural world around me *so that I can exploit it better*. Which wildflowers can I eat? What’s the name of that one plant where when you run through a field of them it sounds like popcorn popping? Can I eat those too?!

(I never stopped wanting to stick interesting plants in my mouth: I just learned to resist it, to assume everything was poisonous until proven otherwise. And for the most part, nobody ever taught me which interesting plants I didn’t have to resist.)


Tags:

#let👏six👏year👏olds👏eat👏pretty👏dandelion👏flowers #replies #gardening #food #my childhood #poison cw? #this probably deserves some other warning tag but I am not sure what


{{next post in sequence}}

{{previous post in sequence}}


brin-bellway:

https://brin-bellway.dreamwidth.org/89538.html

@rustingbridges replied:

tomatoes really don’t travel well

they’re one of the fruits where the supermarket variety is the supermarket variety because it survives the trip, not because they’re good

meanwhile tomato plants are really low effort. if you have favorable conditions you can do literally nothing

Where are you *finding* conditions that aren’t full of weeds and wildlife-competing-with-you-for-the-food and the occasional blight? A greenhouse?

(…actually, that might not be a bad idea. I *have* heard of people building little personal greenhouses in their backyards, and nothing keeps squirrels from taking one bite out of your mom’s tomato and walking away like a fucking *door*, right?)

Re: surviving the trip, home-grown zucchinis taste about the same but we’ve noticed the shelf life is *vastly* longer. Store-bought zucchinis start to shrivel up and go soft within a few days of bringing them home; home-grown zucchinis can sit in the fridge for several *weeks*. Makes it a lot easier to plan your meals.

Honestly, probably a good part of my problem with gardening is that, because *Mom* loves home-grown tomatoes for some fucking reason, they end up the focal point of the garden and a great deal of my gardening-related labour is thoroughly alienated: I never see the fruits *or* the vegetables of my labour.

A garden optimised for what *I* thought was most worth growing would have zero tomatoes and more garlic and zucchini, with perhaps just enough potatoes to keep in practice so that I can put potatoes in the victory garden. And probably more perennials like mulberries. And possibly mushrooms. And I would want to do a bunch of research and expert-consultation regarding which weeds are secretly edible, since anything *that* easy to grow sounds like something I should take advantage of.

(I’ve been meaning to do some more digging into how to eat dandelions. I’ve heard you can put the new greens in salads and the petals in pancake batter, but I don’t normally eat salads *or* pancakes. Can you just, like, munch on a raw dandelion flower straight-up? Can I fulfil my childhood dream of eating a pretty flower I found in the backyard?)


Tags:

#replies #rustingbridges #gardening #food #speaking of fulfilling childhood food dreams I’ve started hearing rumours that *cantaloupe seeds* are edible #that you can treat them the same way you’d treat pumpkin seeds #I rarely eat cantaloupes these days but god I spent so long as a kid wishing I could eat cantaloupe seeds #maybe (after some double-checking) I should buy a cantaloupe just so I can finally eat the seeds #(not that I wouldn’t *also* eat the fruit)


{{next post in sequence}}

{{previous post in sequence}}


@moral-autism​ replied to your post:

Tell us about the web serials? Anything good?

I’ve seen one of each so far.

(I can’t find a way to sort either of these chronologically, so I’ve linked to the reverse-chronological pages)

Seattle by Night [link] (based on the author’s TTRPG campaign, by a guy who does a lot of those) started publishing in the spring of 2020 and is set in the-present-day-as-of-start-of-publishing. It is canon compliant.

It reminds me of the thread you were in once (at least I’m pretty sure it was you? can’t find it now, though…oh, wait, here’s a copy [link]) about stories that are *informed* by their speculative worlds without being *about* them, but applied to the real world: the story’s not *about* COVID-19, but its presence pervades everything. Seattle by Night has got its own stuff going on, but it’s *very much* set in the spring of 2020 and you will never once forget that.

The Chilliad [link] started publishing in 2018, is set twenty minutes into the future (basically present day but with self-driving cars good enough that blind people can use them independently), and has declared COVID-19 to be non-canon via a fourth-wall-poking joke:

“well, maybe some of us studied public policy and then a global pandemic hit so we are stuck at home without a full-time job, slowly going insane,” homer snaps.

“co-vid what?” asks donut mouth. “i thought you were a poet.”

“huh?” homer asks, blinking. “i don’t know. maybe i’m still drunk. i think i’m dissociating. you should send me to a hospital.”

“nice try,” says ray ban.


Tags:

#replies #moral autism #recs #storytime #covid19 #illness mention #Iliad #(fun fact: apparently Tumblr defaults to capitalising that ”iLiad”) #(some sort of buggy heuristic I presume) #fanfic


{{next post in sequence}}

{{previous post in sequence}}


aa49d59ecd971a3ba9bdd142e45b94af69c121f2

twitblr:

Definitely masking up post-COVID (x) {{the original link didn’t actually lead anywhere; I have replaced it with a genuine source link}}

 

juliainfinland:

Also, let’s keep having soap and disinfectant dispensers everywhere.

 

derinthescarletpescatarian:

By contrast, I’ve been getting the same number of sniffles that I do every year even though there’s no one to catch them from, which is how I learned this year that I’m not prone to minor colds; I’m prone to hayfever.

 

brin-bellway:

Huh, you’re still getting hayfever with a mask? I started wearing a mask in 2017 *specifically* to avoid pollen, and it’s been working wonderfully for me.

Have you been keeping the mask on outside, and when near front doors that people are opening a lot? Does it have a well-fitted nosepiece?

I also had no colds in the calendar year 2020. It used to be fairly normal for me to go entire years without getting sick (after I adjusted to my current microbial milieu, that is; I got sick a *lot* the first couple years I lived in Canada), but then I started working a customer-facing job where nobody else ever took sick leave and staff members were forbidden from wearing masks, and I went from a cold every 1 – 2 years to a cold every few months. Getting rid of that damned fast-food cold rate wasn’t worth what it’s cost, but it’s a very nice silver lining.

(for anyone who finds my rate of colds bogglingly low: I’m guessing the two big components are “trained myself out of touching my face in public when I was a pre-teen, and always wash my hands upon returning home” and “rarely travel”, in that order)

I didn’t even used to do any anti-airborne measures†, just anti-fomite. I plan to start wearing a mask in indoor public spaces from October – March or so each year and on public transit year-round, and it’ll be very interesting to see what that does to my baseline cold rate.

(also, on a broader scale, it will be interesting to see if COVID-19 vaccines grant any cross-protection against cold-type coronaviruses)

†Except in extreme situations like “on an airplane two seats away from a coughing dude”. Guess who didn’t get sick until an incubation period *after* the rest of her family? (unfortunately there’s only so much you can isolate from people you’re sharing a hotel room with)

 

derinthescarletpescatarian:

I very rarely wear a mask. I hardly leave the house and when I do, almost nobody wears masks here because there’s no covid in my state outside of the quarantined medi-hotels for infected international arrivals; we just sanitise, social distance, keep records of where we go and get tested any time symptoms show up so that when it does show up, we can respond before it’s got more than a couple of people. The distancing and group size limits are enough that basically nobody’s getting colds.

My probably-hayfever is very mild and isn’t debilitating at all (which is probably why it took me so long to notice); I just get a sniffly, runny nose so I haven’t bothered with any pollen precautions. They’d be more annoying than just living with it.

 

brin-bellway:

Fair enough, I suppose.

When I started wearing pollen masks, my only symptom was mild sore throats. The main problem I was having was that pollen attacks felt exactly like…well, the onset of a cold. *Physically* the sore throats per se weren’t a big deal, but I hated never being sure whether or not I was coming down with something.

I’ve started getting runny noses too now, which I found even worse in that they’re impairing in their own right. Maybe I’m just more bothered by having a runny nose than you are.

 

alarajrogers:

My allergies are for animals and dust. I have pets and am far too disorganized to dust. So yeah, I’m actually just as miserable this year as I am every year, but I definitely have noticed, no colds. Runny nose and sneezing and occasional sore throat and cough… but at my age, the biggest symptom of a cold is a draining and horrible fatigue. All my fatigue this year comes from diabetes and depression.

I do think I’m going to keep using masks during the winter every year.

 

brin-bellway:

At your age? Are you implying you *didn’t* get horrible draining fatigue from colds when you were younger?

When I saw that one of the DSM rules is that in order to qualify as having clinical depression it has to be at least two weeks, I thought “ah, of course, they’re thinking of self-limiting diseases”. The last week of December, 2017, I had a cold that *didn’t* come with a transient depressive episode, and it was amazing how much less it sucked. Turns out that while sore throats and stuffy noses and coughing fits *are* pretty annoying, *most* of the badness of colds is from direct inducement of misery.

…if there are people who *normally* don’t get depression from colds, that would explain a lot about how blase they are about disease prevention.

(…“people with enough depression at baseline that colds are just background noise” would also explain a lot but in a much more horrifying way. you indicate that in at least some cases they can be distinguished, though.)

@rustingbridges replied: “no, I don’t feel that way. identifying a cold mostly consists of ruling out allergies and guessing

holy fuck


Tags:

#this explains so much #oh my god #replies #illness tw #is the blue I see the same as the blue you see #depression


{{next post in sequence}}

{{previous post in sequence}}


maryellencarter:

brin-bellway:

maryellencarter:

4b51025d79f39f30f9e021e5513e5b55b1f06902

@rustingbridges The bacon pretty much dissolved, just added some flavor. Onion might be a good idea but I absolutely loathe trying to chop the damn things. Do they sell pre-chopped onion?

Sausage might be a good mix-in. Maybe just thaw and chop some breakfast links and toss them in. That might be a good plan.

Onion powder?

For my dad’s kidney beans we use hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce, chopped green bell pepper, salt, black pepper, onion, and garlic. When I make hummus I pretty much just embrace the bland, apart from some garlic and salt.

Worcestershire sauce! I definitely need some. I think I had looked for onion powder at Target but they were all out, and in my experience onion powder and paprika don’t really have any flavor anyway. Maybe the bottles my family had were just very stale though

moral-autism replied: “I’ve seen stores sell both fresh prechopped onion and frozen chopped onion potato mixes…


Tags:

#conversational aglets #food #the more you know #bluespace #replies

{{previous post in sequence}}


brin-bellway:

https://brin-bellway.dreamwidth.org/78928.html

@itsbenedict​​ replied: “i’m a resident of 2020 and thought that meant “sun” until you explained it”

Potential near-future mes dealing with the aftermath of coronal-mass-ejection EMPs are definitely grumbling about “don’t we have *enough* coronas fucking us over this year?”.

(I’m actually in the middle of reading a thing about this right now: https://www.governmentattic.org/27docs/UnpubFEMAgeomagRptsU_2010-12.pdf )


Tags:

#replies #itsbenedict #101 Uses for Infrastructureless Computers #apocalypse cw #illness tw #covid19

{{previous post in sequence (which is *not* the same as the post replied to)}}


@rustingbridges​ replied to your post:

surgical masks do not seal that well ime                         

basically all the background smells come thru

yeah it would be nice if they came with better nose pieces but they don’t

Firstly: it can be easy to acclimate, and the different between surgical-mask and maskless is often best observed through comparison. When you take your mask *off*, especially but not necessarily outdoors, are you abruptly hit with a wave of scent?

(Taking off my mask for a solo picnic a couple weeks ago was a powerful experience. After all these months of worrying every time I smelled anything outside my house, it was bittersweet to be so viscerally reminded that yes, I really am missing a lot.)

Did you have the same problems with 2010s-made masks, back when they let ordinary people have medical-grade ones? I tried a 2020-made disposable mask a couple months ago and it was complete shit, absolutely did let all of those background scents through [link].

I saw some random doctor recently saying that he supplements his nosepieces by putting a band-aid seal on over the top. Seems worth a shot: might try it at work tonight, I *have* been noticing early signs of nosepiece failure in both of my cloth masks. (So far I’ve just planted my glasses firmly over the top to help hold it down.)


Tags:

#replies #covid19 #illness tw