soaringsearingphoenix:

soaringsearingphoenix:

sufficientlylargen:

soaringsearingphoenix:

The worst part of human adulthood is being your own zookeeper

I want to stuff a pumpkin full of raw meat and roll it around my enclosure, but I also know that I’ll have to be the one to clean up afterwards :-(

Take steps to minimize the mess! Put a cheap, disposable plastic tarp down in the area you’ll be rolling it around. And.. Maybe recognize your species-specific needs and cook the meat first

Actually, if we’re going for species-specific enrichment, a pumpkin may not be the best solution. We’re not built for pouncing on prey or batting it around. We’re distinguished by our persistence hunting and tool use

What you should do is put a pack of jerky on top of a roomba, go in another room and count to ten like you’re playing hide and seek – or use this time to find a tool to use – and when you come back, try to catch it by setting a trap or by pinning it down with a stick

When you want a greater challenge, have a friend drive an RC car full of jerky around the park, and chase it until it runs out of battery

One time when I was a kid my parents took a bunch of hollow plastic Easter eggs, filled them with chocolates, and hid them around the house for the kids to find, and it is dawning on me that this was the gathering equivalent of the above hunting enrichment.


Tags:

#reply via reblog #evolution #games #food #my childhood

karnalesbian:

minatokun:

Accounting majors who hurt you

i read this as the beginning of a list, not as a question


Tags:

#first thought: ”I mean I *do* have a bit of a sadistic streak” #second thought: ”wait this was a *question*? I thought it was a concept” #third thought: ”how dare you assume it must be a reaction to something traumatic” #fourth thought: ”…the people who laid off my dad in 2006” #fifth thought: ”……the people who forced my dad’s *ancestors* to become a mercantile caste #thereby accidentally creating what was effectively a breeding program selecting for accounting talent” #(if the way to obtain enough resources to feed/house/etc lots of kids is to be good at your job) #(and all the jobs available to you are in finance) #(and this keeps on being true for many generations…) #tag rambles #adventures in University Land #evolution #Judaism #adventures in human capitalism #anger management

maryellencarter:

senator-mon-mothma:

Star Wars never really explores the cool time-keeping situations that you can end up with in a society that spans multiple planets: 

  • planets with no moon that don’t have a time increment between days and years
  • planets with a dozen moons where understanding their cycles involves university courses
  • multi-planet star systems where the position of the other planet features prominently in calendar systems
  • tidally locked planets with no days (or years, really, because even though they’re orbiting a star they wouldn’t have significant changes in seasons)
  • and not only do they not have days or years, they have no cultural concept of those things and are bewildered by the rest of the galaxy’s obsession with measuring time
  • planets with years so long that they’re useless as a way of measuring age, so people give their age in months instead
  • planets with like 6 hour days where people are used to sleeping frequently for only a couple hours at a time
  • the space equivalent of jetlag involves adjusting to a new day length, not just a new time zone
  • when two planets have slightly different day lengths, the days shift relative to each other, so if you travel frequently between two such planets, sometimes the days line up perfectly and sometimes you have to deal with 12 hours of “jet”lag

And there are tons of interesting cultural implications that go along with using Coruscant time as a standard throughout the galaxy:

  • standard Coruscant dates have basically no correlation to seasons on planets with different year lengths, so to even guess at the weather during a historical date given in standard time you need to do calculations
  • everyone has a different age in local years and standard years, and a different birthday
  • some planets have days much longer or shorter than standard days, so your standard birthday might be spread over a few local days or vice versa
  • stuff like being old enough to drive – it tends to go in round numbers of local years, so even on planets where the rule is “about 18 standard”, you have some planets where it’s actually 17.36 standard years, or 19.1, or whatever works out nicely in local years
  • planets that follow Coruscant standard time and totally ignore natural phenomena on their own planets
  • up to and including days – they force themselves into sleep cycles with nothing to do with the sun rising and setting
  • planets that refuse to use standard time even in official settings, and pilots hate having to travel there because the space port is always chaotic because no one knows what time it is
  • the Separatists try to switch to another time system than Coruscant standard and it’s a total mess but it would be embarrassing to switch back
  • the Rebellion learns their lesson from this and doesn’t try to change the standard time system even though the New Republic government is no longer based on Coruscant
  • people pay less and less attention to standard time as you get farther from the core
  • planets with similar natural time cycles to Coruscant have more prosperous economies and produce more prominent and successful people, although the effect is subtle enough that it goes unnoticed until someone randomly decides to check for correlation

Apparently there’s an entry in one of the official Legends atlases that says Taanab has a 46-hour day. Literally nothing else in canon that I know of does anything with this. I’ve occasionally pondered using it in something, but I always come back to the same question: how the fuck does a farming planet settled by humans function if its day doesn’t match up to human circadian rhythms? Changing the length of day-cycle your body expects is fucking *hard*. Now, a 48-hour day I could see working okay with some adaptations, but 46? No. You’d have weeks where half the planet was farming in the dark.

(I wonder if anyone has ever done experiments on small babies to check whether a circadian rhythm is nature or nurture. Probably they have.)

IIRC it’s “generally mostly nature, but different proportions of nature and nurture in different individuals”. “What time of day you expect to sleep”, “what day length you expect to have”, and “how flexible each expectation is” are all axes along which people vary.

(Most people expect a day length *slightly* longer than 24 hours but by a small enough margin that it’s not a big deal (I guess once it’s close enough to be not-a-big-deal there’s not much pressure to fine-tune it further? maybe?): expecting a day length significantly different from 24 hours sucks about as much as you’d think.)

Depending on the timescales involved and how common moving between planets is, you might wind up with slightly different strains of human adapted to each planet’s length, or maybe just end up selecting for flexible circadian cycles.

(Personally, I suspect I have a baseline noticeable-but-weak circadian cycle masked and/or reinforced by general autistic routine-loving. I strongly prefer to sleep at a consistent time in the short term but have only a weak preference for diurnality in the long term, and pay more attention to artificial cues than to natural ones. I wonder how I’d do on one of those planets that follows Coruscant time and to hell with its own world’s rhythms.)


Tags:

#Star Wars #reply via reblog #circadian rhythms #is the blue I see the same as the blue you see #evolution

etirabys:

The fact that bonobos and chimps are our closest genetic relatives pushes my estimation of the probability that [the world moves according to the design of some greater power that has a special interest in humanity] from “extremely unlikely” to “slightly less extremely unlikely”. Like… really? Our two closest relatives are – sorry for the gross oversimplification – ‘violent maniacs’ and ‘relatively egalitarian, sex loving hippies’? These were the familial revelations awaiting our species as it grappled with its origins and destiny, and the biological parameters of both? That seems only slightly less subtle than a wise voice from the skies intoning gravely, You Can Choose


Tags:

#evolution #I didn’t actually laugh aloud but it still amused me enough to reblog

Can you tell who this is?

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rustingbridges:

Cut for length.

FWIW when I took one of those internet tests I scored inbetween average normie and average faceblind, which corresponds pretty well to my lived experience – e.g. I often don’t recognize somebody the second time I see them, but usually start to after that. I have no trouble recognizing my coworkers, but I get the two bald guys in sales who I occasionally exchange pleasantries with confused.

Assuming the friend is an actual friend, not just a friendly acquantaince (inside the dunbar group?), I think not recognizing them automatically would matter.<<

Well, whenever I hear people draw a distinction between “friend” and “friendly acquaintance”, they almost always define “friend” so strictly that I have had maybe one or two friends in the past decade, and no friends whose faces I saw frequently. (honestly, where do the friend-vs-acquaintance people find so many people who don’t respond to interpersonal problems by contemptuously brushing them off)

This is what I was trying to indicate with the dunbar group comment, should have made it more clear, sorry. I meant your 100 or 200 closest associates.

I can reliably recognise housemates at the mall, and have nobody else whose faces I have as much experience with as one would have with one’s band members. I can suspect that a person at the mall is my boss, but not with confidence; however, I’ve only been around him ~[3 gradually increasing to 8]† hours/week for 1.5 years, so it’s to be expected that I’m only in the middle stages of learning his face.

(He is not faceblind–or at least, he’s significantly better at keeping track of which customers are regulars than I am–but he still didn’t spot me. I asked about how his Boxing Day went a couple days later and confirmed that he was at the mall that day, so it probably was him I saw.)

Oh people totally miss each other all the time in big crowds, even facenormies. I think a lot of it is just never even noticing the other person at all. My impression is that faceblindness is when you can intentionally look someone in the face and not be sure, as opposed to more general lack of awareness (which I think is pretty common in normies).

If we can do a little evolutionary speculation here, in the ancestral environment, telling whether the guy you just saw in the forest is in your band, or a stranger, or the particular guy in the band who would really benefit if you weren’t around is a matter of life and death.<<

While this isn’t all that different from what I said, it does make it more clear why, if someone did mutate an unusually good facial-recognition ability, it would get selected for and eventually become the norm. If you don’t know whether someone’s an enemy and neither do they, that’s far less dangerous than if they know you’re enemies and you don’t.

Also, not knowing by the face whether someone’s in your tribe is something even mezzoprosopons or whatever the hell we’re calling them have to deal with these days, and they deal with it by simply making tribe members wear distinctive clothing when there’s a chance they might encounter an enemy [link].

(and I feel like a lot of the reasons that I refrain from murdering people would still apply to the stalking-a-rival-in-the-forest thing, but perhaps my threshold for “I am willing to accept X risk of Y-severity punishment†† in order to get the benefits of committing this crime” is unusually strict; probably an anxiety thing)

I’m no expert but my impression that what we know of hunter-gatherers is that they experience much higher rates of violent death than moderns do and that murder is an issue and violent conflict between groups tended to be irregular and probably involved a lot of raiding and the like.

So I’m not saying that everyone would be murdering their rivals in the forest, and hunter gatherer you might not, but I think the temptation to have your enemey experience a “hunting accident” was probably something that happened.

And I imagine groups probably did have significant elements of attire, possibly even some just for violence, but if your camp is getting raided by surprise you’re not going to have time for that.

So here’s a hypothetical: you are a 12 year old girl in said camp getting raided. You hide away so you don’t get caught, but you see a man coming. Your group consists of 50ish relations. Is that guy coming by your uncle once removed john? Or do you need to run? Sure, you’re not totally screwed if you can’t tell, but it sure would help.


Tags:

#I don’t think I have much to say in response to this but: #conversational aglets #prosopagnosia #evolution #murder cw

Can you tell who this is?

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rustingbridges:

brin-bellway:

rustingbridges:

prosopanonymous:

brin-bellway:

image

I suspected it might be Abraham Lincoln when I could only see around the edge, but the more they revealed, the less sure I got, until by the end I was convinced it wasn’t him. You tagged the post “Abraham Lincoln”, so I guess I should’ve gone with my first thought.

I note that when I took one of those online facial recognition quizzes, I had a similar experience with Barack Obama: my first thought was that it was him, but then I thought “no, that can’t be him, he isn’t that old” and failed the question (like I did every other question on that quiz). I’d forgotten how much politics ages you. (Though in Lincoln’s case, the “no, that can’t be him” was because this face looks too wide to be him.)

(Who says there has to be an evolutionary advantage? All a trait really has to do to stick around is not get you killed too often.)

Same- I only needed 4 tiles taken away before I knew who it was.  Personally, I’m familiar with that picture, so I didn’t have any doubts as more was revealed.

And no, there doesn’t have to be an evolutionary advantage, though it could be argued since it’s a pretty large subpopulation. And if it prevents you from not being killed too often, couldn’t that be considered an evolutionary advantage? I’m hardly an evolutionary psychologist, but I love hearing the arguments for or against certain traits to exist due to evolution.

It’s not that it prevents you from being killed too often, it’s that it doesn’t actively get you killed enough to have been weeded out of the gene pool.

Adverse mutations can stick around for a long time if they’re bundled with genes that otherwise do well. This happens a lot with populations that go through bottlenecks – whatever’s left afterwards is going to stick around for a while.

e.g. the whole vitamin c thing seems like a loss for no good reason and we’re all stuck with it.

As a sidenote, given the population boom in the last few hundred years there’s gotta be a whole bunch of weird mutations that exist in greater numbers than you ever would have expected.

Anyway have you heard the whole neanderthal / autism idea? @slartibartfastibast has a whole ancient aliens slideshow + youtube video on it.

As a further side note, I wonder what the trade off for lactase persistence is. It must be something, if lactase stopped persisting at some point.

>>It’s not that it prevents you from being killed too often, it’s that it doesn’t actively get you killed enough to have been weeded out of the gene pool.<<

Yeah, that’s what I was trying to say, but I think she misunderstood and I didn’t bother trying to clarify.

Come to think of it, why *do* specialised facial-recognition modules exist? If you’re living in a band society, interacting with the same small group of people over and over, you can just use your general-object-recognition module for that. Yeah, it’ll take a few years to start getting the hang of it, but those’ll be childhood years in which you aren’t expected to be very competent at stuff anyway.

A lot of the life problems caused by prosopagnosia are not so much from “being bad at faces” as from “being *worse at faces than others expect you to be*”, and if people’s expectations were lower it would be much less of a problem. There’s a possible universe in which the default reaction to walking past a friend at the mall and they act like they’ve never met you is not “how rude, what did I ever do to them” but “yeah, the human brain’s not built to deal with crowds, makes sense that they didn’t recognise me. TBH, I only knew for sure it was them because they had that backpack with the hole patched with denim”.

>>Anyway have you heard the whole neanderthal / autism idea? @slartibartfastibast has a whole ancient aliens slideshow + youtube video on it.<<

Link?

Come to think of it, why do specialised facial-recognition modules exist? If you’re living in a band society, interacting with the same small group of people over and over, you can just use your general-object-recognition module for that.

So if the example you give later (walking past a friend at the mall and not recognizing them) is the sort of thing that actually happens, then I’d guess general recognition without the extra facial recognition just isn’t good enough.

Assuming the friend is an actual friend, not just a friendly acquantaince (inside the dunbar group?), I think not recognizing them automatically would matter.

If we can do a little evolutionary speculation here, in the ancestral environment, telling whether the guy you just saw in the forest is in your band, or a stranger, or the particular guy in the band who would really benefit if you weren’t around is a matter of life and death.

And for babies, recognizing your mother does seem pretty important.

Not sure about the link. I’d have to dig it out. If you want to siikr for it maybe try neanderthal or eusocial or something.

>>Assuming the friend is an actual friend, not just a friendly acquantaince (inside the dunbar group?), I think not recognizing them automatically would matter.<<

Well, whenever I hear people draw a distinction between “friend” and “friendly acquaintance”, they almost always define “friend” so strictly that I have had maybe one or two friends in the past decade, and no friends whose faces I saw frequently. (honestly, where do the friend-vs-acquaintance people *find* so many people who don’t respond to interpersonal problems by contemptuously brushing them off)

I can reliably recognise housemates at the mall, and have nobody else whose faces I have as much experience with as one would have with one’s band members. I can *suspect* that a person at the mall is my boss, but not with confidence; however, I’ve only been around him ~[3 gradually increasing to 8]† hours/week for 1.5 years, so it’s to be expected that I’m only in the middle stages of learning his face.

(He is not faceblind–or at least, he’s significantly better at keeping track of which customers are regulars than I am–but he still didn’t spot me. I asked about how his Boxing Day went a couple days later and confirmed that he was at the mall that day, so it probably *was* him I saw.)

>>If we can do a little evolutionary speculation here, in the ancestral environment, telling whether the guy you just saw in the forest is in your band, or a stranger, or the particular guy in the band who would really benefit if you weren’t around is a matter of life and death.<<

While this isn’t all that different from what I said, it does make it more clear why, if someone *did* mutate an unusually good facial-recognition ability, it would get selected for and eventually become the norm. If you don’t know whether someone’s an enemy *and neither do they*, that’s far less dangerous than if they know you’re enemies and you don’t.

Also, not knowing by the face whether someone’s in your tribe is something even mezzoprosopons or whatever the hell we’re calling them have to deal with these days, and they deal with it by simply making tribe members wear distinctive clothing when there’s a chance they might encounter an enemy [link].

(and I feel like a lot of the reasons that *I* refrain from murdering people would still apply to the stalking-a-rival-in-the-forest thing, but perhaps my threshold for “I am willing to accept X risk of Y-severity punishment†† in order to get the benefits of committing this crime” is unusually strict; probably an anxiety thing)

†I work more hours than this, but these are specifically the hours that overlap with the hours he’s there.

††note: if you assault someone and they fight back and hurt *you*, that also counts as a punishment for this purpose


Tags:

#reply via reblog #is the blue I see the same as the blue you see #prosopagnosia #evolution #murder mention


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Can you tell who this is?

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rustingbridges:

prosopanonymous:

brin-bellway:

image

I suspected it might be Abraham Lincoln when I could only see around the edge, but the more they revealed, the less sure I got, until by the end I was convinced it wasn’t him. You tagged the post “Abraham Lincoln”, so I guess I should’ve gone with my first thought.

I note that when I took one of those online facial recognition quizzes, I had a similar experience with Barack Obama: my first thought was that it was him, but then I thought “no, that can’t be him, he isn’t that old” and failed the question (like I did every other question on that quiz). I’d forgotten how much politics ages you. (Though in Lincoln’s case, the “no, that can’t be him” was because this face looks too wide to be him.)

(Who says there has to be an evolutionary advantage? All a trait really has to do to stick around is not get you killed too often.)

Same- I only needed 4 tiles taken away before I knew who it was.  Personally, I’m familiar with that picture, so I didn’t have any doubts as more was revealed.

And no, there doesn’t have to be an evolutionary advantage, though it could be argued since it’s a pretty large subpopulation. And if it prevents you from not being killed too often, couldn’t that be considered an evolutionary advantage? I’m hardly an evolutionary psychologist, but I love hearing the arguments for or against certain traits to exist due to evolution.

It’s not that it prevents you from being killed too often, it’s that it doesn’t actively get you killed enough to have been weeded out of the gene pool.

Adverse mutations can stick around for a long time if they’re bundled with genes that otherwise do well. This happens a lot with populations that go through bottlenecks – whatever’s left afterwards is going to stick around for a while.

e.g. the whole vitamin c thing seems like a loss for no good reason and we’re all stuck with it.

As a sidenote, given the population boom in the last few hundred years there’s gotta be a whole bunch of weird mutations that exist in greater numbers than you ever would have expected.

Anyway have you heard the whole neanderthal / autism idea? @slartibartfastibast has a whole ancient aliens slideshow + youtube video on it.

As a further side note, I wonder what the trade off for lactase persistence is. It must be something, if lactase stopped persisting at some point.

>>It’s not that it prevents you from being killed too often, it’s that it doesn’t actively get you killed enough to have been weeded out of the gene pool.<<

Yeah, that’s what I was trying to say, but I think she misunderstood and I didn’t bother trying to clarify.

Come to think of it, why *do* specialised facial-recognition modules exist? If you’re living in a band society, interacting with the same small group of people over and over, you can just use your general-object-recognition module for that. Yeah, it’ll take a few years to start getting the hang of it, but those’ll be childhood years in which you aren’t expected to be very competent at stuff anyway.

A lot of the life problems caused by prosopagnosia are not so much from “being bad at faces” as from “being *worse at faces than others expect you to be*”, and if people’s expectations were lower it would be much less of a problem. There’s a possible universe in which the default reaction to walking past a friend at the mall and they act like they’ve never met you is not “how rude, what did I ever do to them” but “yeah, the human brain’s not built to deal with crowds, makes sense that they didn’t recognise me. TBH, I only knew for sure it was them because they had that backpack with the hole patched with denim”.

>>Anyway have you heard the whole neanderthal / autism idea? @slartibartfastibast has a whole ancient aliens slideshow + youtube video on it.<<

Link?


Tags:

#reply via reblog #prosopagnosia #evolution


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Can you tell who this is?

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{{Title link: https://brinbellway.wordpress.com/2014/08/26/can-you-tell-who-this-is/ }}

prosopanonymous:

brin-bellway:

image

I suspected it might be Abraham Lincoln when I could only see around the edge, but the more they revealed, the less sure I got, until by the end I was convinced it wasn’t him. You tagged the post “Abraham Lincoln”, so I guess I should’ve gone with my first thought.

I note that when I took one of those online facial recognition quizzes, I had a similar experience with Barack Obama: my first thought was that it was him, but then I thought “no, that can’t be him, he isn’t that old” and failed the question (like I did every other question on that quiz). I’d forgotten how much politics ages you. (Though in Lincoln’s case, the “no, that can’t be him” was because this face looks too wide to be him.)

(Who says there has to be an evolutionary advantage? All a trait really has to do to stick around is not get you killed too often.)

Same- I only needed 4 tiles taken away before I knew who it was.  Personally, I’m familiar with that picture, so I didn’t have any doubts as more was revealed.

And no, there doesn’t have to be an evolutionary advantage, though it could be argued since it’s a pretty large subpopulation. And if it prevents you from not being killed too often, couldn’t that be considered an evolutionary advantage? I’m hardly an evolutionary psychologist, but I love hearing the arguments for or against certain traits to exist due to evolution.


Tags:

#(August 2014) #(truncated thread for some reason (maybe that old reblog-as-link glitch); link to beginning already included) #conversational aglets #prosopagnosia


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galahadwilder:

A sudden, terrifying thought

When you see an animal with its eyes set to the front, like wolves, or humans, that’s usually a predator animal.

tumblr_inline_p3cgzxXXO71u64y56_500

If you see an animal with its eyes set farther back, though—to the side—that animal is prey.

tumblr_inline_p3cgzyRGi71u64y56_500

Now look at this dragon.

tumblr_inline_p3cgzzir4A1u64y56_500

See those eyes?

tumblr_inline_p3cgzzF6E01u64y56_500

They’re to the SIDE.

tumblr_inline_p3cgzzGz3D1u64y56_500

This raises an interesting—and terrifying—question.

tumblr_inline_p3ch00A93d1u64y56_500

What in the name of Lovecraft led evolution to consider DRAGONS…

As PREY?

dorito-and-pinetree:

I know this isn’t part of my blogs theme but like this is interesting

haiku-robot:

i know this isn’t part 

of my blogs theme but like this 

is interesting


^Haiku^bot^8.I detect haikus with 5-7-5 format.Sometimes I make mistakes.|@image-transcribing-bot@portmanteau-bot|Contact|HAIKU BOT NO|Good bot!| Beep-boop!

angel-of-double-death:

@howdidigetinvolved

perfectly-generic-blog:

The eyes-in-the-front thing (usually) only applies to mammals. Crocodiles, arguably the inspiration for dragons, have eyes that look to the sides despite being a predator.

pyrrhiccomedy:

hey what up I’m about to be That Asshole

This isn’t a mammalian thing. When people talk about ‘eyes on the front’ or ‘eyes on the side,’ they’re really talking about binocular vision vs monocular vision. Binocular vision is more advantageous for predators because it’s what gives you depth perception; i.e, the distance you need to leap, lunge, or swipe to take out the fast-moving thing in front of you. Any animal that can position its eyes in a way that it has overlapping fields of vision has binocular vision. That includes a lot of predatory reptiles, including komodo dragons, monitor lizards, and chameleons.

(The eyes-in-front = predator / eyes-on-sides = prey thing holds true far more regularly for birds than it does for mammals. Consider owls, hawks, and falcons vs parrots, sparrows, and doves.)

But it’s not like binocular vision is inherently “better” than monocular vision. It’s a trade-off: you get better at leap-strike-kill, but your field of vision is commensurately restricted, meaning you see less stuff. Sometimes, the evolutionary benefit of binocular vision just doesn’t outweigh the benefit of seeing the other guy coming. Very few forms of aquatic life have binocular vision unless they have eye stalks, predator or not, because if you live underwater, the threat could be coming from literally any direction, so you want as wide a field of view as you can get. If you see a predator working monocular vision, it’s a pretty safe assumption that there is something else out there dangerous enough that their survival is aided more by knowing where it is than reliably getting food inside their mouths.

For example, if you are a crocodile, there is a decent chance that a hippo will cruise up your shit and bite you in half. I’d say that makes monocular vision worthwhile.

Which brings us back to OP’s point. Why would dragon evolution favor field of view over depth perception?

A lot of the stories I’ve read painted the biggest threats to dragons (until knights with little shiny sticks came along) as other dragons. Dragons fight each other, dragons have wars. And like fish, a dragon would need to worry about another dragon coming in from any angle. That’s a major point in favor of monocular vision. Moreover, you don’t need depth perception in order to hunt if you can breathe fucking fire. A flamethrower is not a precision weapon. If you can torch everything in front of you, who cares if your prey is 5 feet away or 20? Burn it all and sift among the rubble for meat once everything stops moving.

Really, why would dragons have eyes on the front of their heads? Seems like they’ve got the right idea to me.

nathanpikajew:

this is some good dragon discourse right here, 10/10, and i dont mean to derail the whole thing away from the eyes, but i feel obligated to mention that in many stories and accurate to some reptiles, dragons have an extremely acute sense of smell/taste which would definitely help narrow down the depth perception issue. things smell stronger the closer they are. and i feel like i read somewhere that a blind snake can flick the air with its tongue and track its target mouse with no trouble at all. gotta imagine the “great serpents of the sky” had some pretty advanced biology. enough to make field of view win out against depth perception.

anywho. cool stuff. fear the dragons even if they are the prey cause they still beat us on the food chain.

jabberwockypie:

“A flamethrower is not a precision weapon. If you can torch everything in front of you, who cares if your prey is 5 feet away or 20? Burn it all and sift among the rubble for meat once everything stops moving.”

aqua-cultured:

“only prey animals have eyes on the sides of their heads”

tumblr_inline_pjh2bbcYMA1qd0ran_540

insanekirby:

A) As was stated previously, this rule doesn’t hold for life underwater where binocular vision isn’t worth the limited field of view.

B) Hammerhead sharks hacked the fucking system and spread their eyes so far apart that they have 360 degree field of vision and binocular vision of whatever’s in front of them and behind them.


Tags:

#dragon #interesting