moonlit-tulip:

worldoptimization:

I feel like you hear a lot from people who are like “I have this natural tendency to be very scrupulous and hard on myself and self-sacrificing, and EA ideas exacerbate that, so I have to really set boundaries and practice self-care” and so on

and I feel like that experience probably gets overrepresented due to selection bias, so to do my part in correcting that I just want to say that my natural tendencies are to be kinda lazy and self-interested, and I’m really glad the EA memeplex pushes against those tendencies, even though I’m still more lazy and self-interested than I’d like to be

My natural tendency is to be lazy and self-interested, and I’m glad the EA memeplex includes components compatible with those tendencies. Donating 10% of my income to effective charities as assessed by GiveWell or similar organizations is very low-effort, not a big enough hit to my quality-of-life to be incompatible with my self-interest, and nonetheless does a whole bunch of good in the world; the EA memeplex did a very good job of raising that opportunity to my attention, thus enabling me to fulfill my values altruism-wise far better than I otherwise could have done without abandoning my laziness and self-interest in the process. (Which I’m unlikely to do, since it would go against my self-interest.)

It is in my self-interest to live in a thriving world, and I’m glad the EA memeplex gives me more ways to help make that happen.


Tags:

#donating 10% of my income *would* be a big hit to my quality-of-life #(because every dollar counts when you’re only making like ten grand a year in the first place) #my charity budget is‚ like‚ less than one percent #maybe someday I’ll have reached a point where my house isn’t falling apart and I can reassess that #effective altruism #reply via reblog #is the blue I see the same as the blue you see

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brin-bellway:

hater-of-terfs:

broken-horn-of-equius:

magnetictapedatastorage:

magnetictapedatastorage:

tape casette recorders are compatible with literally every. single. thing. im out here living in 2095.

things you can record (audio only), simply by lying to your computer, telling it that the tape recorder is actually a set of headphones:

  • discord call
  • podcast
  • documentary
  • radio and internet radio
  • music, from any source. without having to download it at all.
  • music you make on virtual pianos/etc
  • noteworthy news items (fireside esque, interviews, huge events)
  • stand-up comedy
  • rented or borrowed media
  • any other sound your pc can produce

and with a VCR you could do all of this AND have the visuals as well… but an audio cassette recorder is a good place to start, since they’re small and simple. I would not recommend a boombox, because those are large and nowadays all very, very bad quality.

Now you may be saying “how is any of this helpful, I want a digital file…” here’s the fucking magic. You go into Audacity (free program), and lie to it that the tape recorder is really a microphone. Then you hit record on Audacity, and hit play on the tape, and let it play at regular speed. Trim and export the digital file, and you’re doing gangbusters. You’re cooking with gas. You’re thinking with portals. You’ve won the internet.

Congratulations, you can “pirate”* anything you want, and literally no one can catch you, because you’re not downloading in the traditional sense. You’re streaming to an external device, and that device is recording what it receives. It’s exactly like taping a live tv show to a VHS. This is a very low-key and non-strenuous task for the computer, since your tape recorder does all the work.

*Is this piracy? No. Well- it’s time shifting. Sort of. Tell it to my Steely Dan albums. Tell it to my The Sims: Hot Date VG Soundtrack album.

OP, dropping surprising knowledge from across time and space:

Fun fact: this is called the analog loophole, and it’s completely impossible to close, even in principle. No matter how much copy protection you add to a piece of media, it will eventually have to be sent to a display and then turned into an audio/video output that humans can interpret, because… that’s the whole fucking point

So even if they find some way to encrypt the signal sent to the display so you can’t intercept it with a VCR or tape recorder (which would be exceedingly difficult if not impossible), at the end of the day you just can’t do anything about someone pointing a camera at the screen or a microphone at the speaker. Yo ho ho

(By the way, I’d love to see someone actually talk about the legal precedent of this wrt it being literally the same thing as recording a TV show on a VCR or recording a mixtape off of the radio, both of which I believe are absolutely unambiguously legal. OP may be right that this is literally, legally, not piracy, but I’m not a lawyer nor am I opposed to crimes so don’t ask me)

What’s the advantage to including a tape recorder in this process, rather than cutting out the middle steps and just having Audacity record your headphone output? Is it just that it bears a closer resemblance to the situations that set legal precedent regarding time-shifting?

Don’t get me wrong, it did occur to me (though by the time I decided it was worth including in my response, I’d already left for work) that OP’s username is magnetictapedatastorage: presumably they take pleasure in integrating tape into their stream-archiving workflow.

But looking at the notes, there seem to be a lot of people under the honest impression that a separate recorder is *required*, and I would like to be clear that–at least in terms of practicality: I can’t speak to legal camouflage–the tape is in fact optional. You can plug a pair of non-lie headphones in and instruct Audacity to record what’s sent to them.


Tags:

#reply via reblog #oh look an update #101 Uses for Infrastructureless Computers

hater-of-terfs:

broken-horn-of-equius:

magnetictapedatastorage:

magnetictapedatastorage:

tape casette recorders are compatible with literally every. single. thing. im out here living in 2095.

things you can record (audio only), simply by lying to your computer, telling it that the tape recorder is actually a set of headphones:

  • discord call
  • podcast
  • documentary
  • radio and internet radio
  • music, from any source. without having to download it at all.
  • music you make on virtual pianos/etc
  • noteworthy news items (fireside esque, interviews, huge events)
  • stand-up comedy
  • rented or borrowed media
  • any other sound your pc can produce

and with a VCR you could do all of this AND have the visuals as well… but an audio cassette recorder is a good place to start, since they’re small and simple. I would not recommend a boombox, because those are large and nowadays all very, very bad quality.

Now you may be saying “how is any of this helpful, I want a digital file…” here’s the fucking magic. You go into Audacity (free program), and lie to it that the tape recorder is really a microphone. Then you hit record on Audacity, and hit play on the tape, and let it play at regular speed. Trim and export the digital file, and you’re doing gangbusters. You’re cooking with gas. You’re thinking with portals. You’ve won the internet.

Congratulations, you can “pirate”* anything you want, and literally no one can catch you, because you’re not downloading in the traditional sense. You’re streaming to an external device, and that device is recording what it receives. It’s exactly like taping a live tv show to a VHS. This is a very low-key and non-strenuous task for the computer, since your tape recorder does all the work.

*Is this piracy? No. Well- it’s time shifting. Sort of. Tell it to my Steely Dan albums. Tell it to my The Sims: Hot Date VG Soundtrack album.

OP, dropping surprising knowledge from across time and space:

ac8ae572bc6f0eb3831b2f5ace01821be794c8ca

Fun fact: this is called the analog loophole, and it’s completely impossible to close, even in principle. No matter how much copy protection you add to a piece of media, it will eventually have to be sent to a display and then turned into an audio/video output that humans can interpret, because… that’s the whole fucking point

So even if they find some way to encrypt the signal sent to the display so you can’t intercept it with a VCR or tape recorder (which would be exceedingly difficult if not impossible), at the end of the day you just can’t do anything about someone pointing a camera at the screen or a microphone at the speaker. Yo ho ho

(By the way, I’d love to see someone actually talk about the legal precedent of this wrt it being literally the same thing as recording a TV show on a VCR or recording a mixtape off of the radio, both of which I believe are absolutely unambiguously legal. OP may be right that this is literally, legally, not piracy, but I’m not a lawyer nor am I opposed to crimes so don’t ask me)

What’s the advantage to including a tape recorder in this process, rather than cutting out the middle steps and just having Audacity record your headphone output? Is it just that it bears a closer resemblance to the situations that set legal precedent regarding time-shifting?


Tags:

#reply via reblog #fun with loopholes #101 Uses for Infrastructureless Computers


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librarychair:

Hey yall, I wanted to make a PSA about this because it’ll be useful to many of you in the United States. You might qualify for public assistance now, specifically because of rising food prices.

The federal poverty line, the biggest determining factor for public assistance, has been kept artificially low for decades because it was based on the outdated assumption that food was the primary expense for most American households. For decades now, shelter has been the larger expense, but the federal poverty limit has still been determined based on the prices of food commodities.

Because food prices have recently gone up, the federal poverty line has gone up significantly as well. This means if you were previously slightly over the income limit to qualify for public assistance such as food stamps or medicaid, you likely qualify now. I’d like to encourage everyone who thinks they might qualify to apply for these programs. The qualification cutoffs are still absurdly low, so please be assured that if you qualify for assistance, you’re not taking something you don’t need or deserve.

Please reblog this if you think your followers will find it useful. I haven’t seen anyone talking about this, it’s just something I noticed recently, so I want the info to become more public to help people who might be struggling.

I’ve found it’s a good practice to, after doing your taxes each year, take a look at that official net income figure and go “does this qualify me for anything?”.

Check your food, your shelter, your utilities, your healthcare. If you take public transit, check that too.

It’s tax season, so it’s about that time again.


Tags:

#adventures in human capitalism #PSA #reply via reblog #I’m still getting my family’s taxes together and I’m interested to see what figures result #it’s plausible they’ll be low enough for subsidised electricity and bus fare this year #it’s also plausible that they won’t #we’ll have to see #(I don’t have access to my brother’s transaction history so I have only a very rough guess at how much he made) #(I’m going to wait to ask until I have the exact net-income figures for everyone else)

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rustingbridges:

one the one hand, washing my hands after moisturizing them kinda defeats the point

on the other hand, I need to use my computer. I’m not gooping my computer

 

brin-bellway:

Three useful tactics:

1. Moisturise in tiny amounts (so that it’s pretty much all been absorbed by the time you reach your computer), making up for it in frequency.

2. Moisturise at bedtime.

3. Wear gloves over the top. (Also combines well with 2, to avoid gooping your bedding.)

 

rustingbridges:

unfortunately there is no tininess of amount that will make my fingertips not feel goopy. if somebody else wanted to rub the moisturizer into the tops of my hands it wouldn’t matter because I wouldn’t have to touch my keys with it

I am extremely weird about hand cleanliness with my stuff and basically only my stuff. I don’t care much normally but if you are using my keyboard, controller, or guitar, you gotta wash them grubby little mitts

I can rub it into the backs of my palms without using my fingertips, by rubbing them together, but I can’t really get the backs and sides of my fingers well done, which is historically a problem area

I technically can use the computer with gloves on, and I have done it in cold weather, but I feel so much less competent at typing and mousing that I really avoid it when possible

I do moisturize before going to sleep and wear gloves over it, but since I prefer to do so after I finish reading on my phone, and I’m often very sleepy by that point, it’s less than maximally reliable

the best solution to this problem is to adequately humidify my environment such that I don’t need to moisturize at all, but until I get the right quantity and quality of humidifiers sorted moisturize I must, and deal with some level of goopiness I must also

the best time slot for moisturization I’ve found for me personally is before going for a walk, as I usually wear gloves anyway and don’t use my hands much

 

brin-bellway:

>>unfortunately there is no tininess of amount that will make my fingertips not feel goopy

I do hear some brands absorb a lot slower than others, so it’s possible switching brands would help. I’m currently experimenting with Live Clean’s “intense moisture” lotion and finding it decent. (A bit of poking at Amazon suggests that Live Clean *exists* in America but might be harder to find there?)

>>I technically can use the computer with gloves on, and I have done it in cold weather, but I feel so much less competent at typing and mousing that I really avoid it when possible

Same, TBH. Apparently it works well for some people, though, and sometimes I’m desperate enough to do it myself.

>>the best solution to this problem is to adequately humidify my environment such that I don’t need to moisturize at all

I run a humidifier in my bedroom overnight, and if I’m not working food service I generally find that moisturising once a day is enough (with larger quantities in winter). But I *am* working food service, so I need to break out the big guns in order to get anywhere near keeping up.

 

brin-bellway:

Also, while we’re on the subject:

I’m not sure where it falls on the absorption-speed spectrum, but in terms of *effectiveness* the best lotion I’ve yet encountered is Beekman’s honey and orange blossom: the only one that’s ever allowed me to actually *keep up* with food-service levels of handwashing instead of just partially mitigating the damage. Horrendously expensive, though, which is why I’m still experimenting with other brands. (Probably less horrendous in America, with domestic shipping costs.)

 

rustingbridges:

yeah some brands are better than others. even very good ones by this metric are imperfect, tho, and tbh I don’t want to spend that much money on goo

if I am only washing my hands for textural reasons I can use water without soap which is much less damaging to the skin, so theoretically with good enough humidification I don’t need any moisturizer. I have achieved this level in new york, it remains to be seen if it’s possible in colder & dryer places.

Update: Aveeno oat and shea butter is *also* good enough to keep up with food-service work, while being much cheaper and *much* more readily available than Beekman. It’s so nice to have fully functional skin again.

Next I’m going to try the store-brand knockoff with a *very nearly* identical ingredient list (even cheaper and almost as readily available) and see how that goes.


Tags:

#reply via reblog #oh look an update #recs #body horror?

bending-sickle:

unpretty:

i am in my thirties and have somehow spent my entire life under the impression that the only difference between hard and soft water was that they taste and feel different. and which one you preferred was based entirely on what you were used to. now i find out that hard water is why my clothes get so fucked up so fast. people without hard water don’t agonize over how many times they can wash a soft blanket before it stops being soft. all those years of reading online discussions about how showering should only take five minutes and every other day you should just rinse your hair out with water. my intense confusion because if i try to take a five minute shower i come out looking and feeling dirtier than when i went in. if my hair gets wet in the shower and i don’t shampoo it i come out looking like i fell in the creek. if i gave myself a quick soapy rinse before work and then ran out the door without extensively moisturizing i would be the itchiest bitch alive in five minutes. i just assumed it was a body chemistry thing. now you’re telling me that other people don’t have that. that i am in Special Circumstances because every time i step in the tub i am effectively taking a mineral bath.

don’t get me fucking started on hard water and yes i am writing this right in the post i am so sorry op but where i live we have hard water (there’s a higher Very Hard level) so i would like to rant with you about how showering makes your skin so itchy and how you live and breath dandruff because your scalp is crying and how soap won’t rub off your hands no matter how hard you scrub and how drying yourself with a towel just leaves you clammy and how you have to wipe every surface down to combat the accumulation of limescale even though it doesn’t help so everything is spotted white and how your plants can just start dying because of the shitty shitty water and how you can technically drink tap water but it tastes terrible so you have to go on pilgrimages to mountain towns to get water from their fountains and how, since we’re ranting about shampoo, you think your hair is Irrevocably and Horribly damaged until you go to a city with soft water and wash it there one (1) time and your hair comes out silky and shiny and like a goddamned commercial yes i am still pissed knowing what my hair could be like if only i weren’t washing it with liquidized minerals

I hope I’m not barging in too hard, but I saw this in the notes and I thought I should tell y’all in case nobody has yet:

It’s possible to plumb a water-softening device into your home pipes. I have one, as do most homes in my area.

I’m *guessing* that for y’all there aren’t big displays of softener salt readily available in every grocery store and most convenience stores, otherwise you’d have found out sooner (although it’s also possible you *do* have displays and didn’t notice because you didn’t realise they were relevant to your interests, I could definitely see myself doing that), but some models run off of resin beads instead and only need the resin replaced every few years (possibly at the cost of worse taste than salt-based systems, but I’m not sure about that part).

I was doing some googling on prices recently because mine is getting old and decrepit, and it looks like it’s on the order of a few thousand if you don’t already have your pipes set up for it, or a few hundred to slot in a unit on piping already designed around it. I’m aware that a few grand is a lot of money and that many people don’t have the authority to make those kinds of changes to their homes, but it’s still good to know that it’s *possible* to have soft water without having to move to a naturally-soft area.


Tags:

#we have one (1) hard-water tap for my mom and brother to drink out of #(because for some reason they actually *like* the taste) #everything else is softened #(except for when the softener unit fails to realise that it needs to cycle on because‚ again‚ decrepit) #(in which case I press the on button manually and 15 minutes later it’s fine) #the more you know #our home and cherished land #is the blue I see the same as the blue you see #PSA #domesticity #reply via reblog


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rustingbridges:

andmaybegayer:

I’ve been wearing my respirator for a while now and I put on a normal trifold mask because I need to do a lot of talking and I forgot how hard it is to get a seal on these things. I keep on adjusting it because I breathe and get a jet of air in my eye.

right? that’s the worst part imo

Have you tried putting a strip of medical tape (or a band-aid) over the top edge?

It’s still more annoying to seal than an elastomeric, but a lot less annoying than trying to seal a mask *without* tape.


Tags:

#the first draft of this reblog had no text in the main post body and the tags #”potential-future me who works as an office receptionist is nodding and grumbling along with this post” #”I am reblogging it on her behalf” #but then I thought ‘wait does Kali know about the tape trick’ #’I should check that’ #illness tw #the more you know #reply via reblog #recs


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rustingbridges:

rustingbridges:

I’ve really got to figure out how to actually use open street maps

@brin-bellway the sticking point that inspired this post was that I make fairly heavy use of google maps’ various annotation features. including the synchronization with contacts, but also various lists of things I’m interested in

I used to have annotations set up on some OSM based app, but that app decided to be expensive and I haven’t figured out how to do this on the one I’ve currently got downloaded (osmand+).

but the main one is that the search doesn’t seem to work very well and the directions often seem a bit wonky. so any time I’m in looking up directions and in a hurry I don’t want to fuck around with it, and just use google maps. which is most of the times I use google maps. and so because I never use it I never get comfortable enough with it to use it under pressure. so here we are

I never use Google Maps annotations, so I’m not sure if I can really help you there. I do use uMap [link] sometimes: is that the sort of thing you mean?

The search and directions can be a bit wonky, yeah, although I like how any map problem I run into is only ever a problem once (because I go on OSM and fix it when I get home). Nice to get the warm prosocial fuzzies.


Tags:

#reply via reblog #maps #recs #for historical reasons I will go ahead and tag this #Brin owns *two* 2010’s computers now #even though I now have a 2020-model smartphone

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rustingbridges:

ime one of the upsides of gas is that as long as you have gas or electric your home has heat and cooking capability

also I’ve never had a gas outage. presumably they run those underground? whereas I’ve lived in places where you were, at some point, definitely going to have the electric out for hours

 

brin-bellway:

…how is your heat set up? Is that from having a gas stove?

I have an electric stove and a gas furnace (also a gas dryer and water heater), and I would have said the exact opposite: one of the *downsides* of gas is that your heat needs *both* gas and electricity to work, and fails if either is missing.

(Not that gas has ever been missing, true, but “works when electricity is out” is like the *one* major advantage combustion-based heating can have, and it can’t even fucking do *that*. It had one job! What am I paying all this carbon for, if not that?!)

(I can*not* fucking wait to get a heat pump and some hybrid solar.)

 

rustingbridges:

huh, TIL. has this always been the case? most of my lengthy power outage memories occur the late 90s / early 00s and the furnace might have been old at the time.

maybe the kerosene space heater people are right after all

What am I paying all this carbon for, if not that?!

my understanding is that vs resistive heating you’re not paying carbon, since gas furnaces are extremely efficient. heat pumps can change this equation, yeah

 

brin-bellway:

My furnace is from 1990. I doubt it’s very efficient; it should, however, give pretty accurate results regarding “what things were like in the late 90s”.

We had a 16-hour power outage in late December a few years back, and it got pretty cold in the house. (Though the downward slope over time was shallower than I would have expected: I guess our insulation is better than I thought.)

I’m not sure what you mean about not paying carbon relative to–oh, are you assuming the electricity is *also* produced by burning gas? We’re mostly nuclear and hydro around here, though with a minority of natural gas.

>>maybe the kerosene space heater people are right after all

I’ve thought about it, but I’d rather not risk it. My current plan for extended cold-weather power outages is to set up a family-sized tent in my kitchen (the only large enough open space for it) and pile on the insulation.

 

rustingbridges:

My furnace is from 1990. I doubt it’s very efficient; it should, however, give pretty accurate results regarding “what things were like in the late 90s”.

right, given that furnaces are often quite old it’s possible the furnace in question was from 1970 or something like that.

but also maybe it just never got that cold, the longest outages I can remember were in the summer. there were some fall / winter ones but as I remember it they were less than a day.

are you assuming the electricity is *also* produced by burning gas

not gas necessarily, but yeah that was assuming fossil fuels. typical furnaces are very efficient at turning fuel into heat, as heat is normally the waste product of energy generation and the only trick is to extract as much heat as possible from waste gases that you want to pipe out of the house. whereas with electric heat the waste heat at the power plant is, well, wasted.

but yeah if you have hydro that’s not at all the case.

I’ve thought about it, but I’d rather not risk it

yeah this was mostly a joke. I’ve been around a few kerosene space heaters and they smelled, which I took as a bad sign in addition to fire risk. I don’t think I’d buy one if I had the option of using an electric one.

as an emergency survival plan I’m willing to consign myself to living in cold weather clothes for a while, which I have anyway for cold weather activities

>>given that furnaces are often quite old it’s possible the furnace in question was from 1970 or something like that

I’d heard that furnaces tend to fail after about 15 years, suggesting our 31.5-year-old furnace is staggeringly ancient. I figured a 1990 furnace would give a decent sense of the state of things circa 1997, since it was halfway through its life expectancy then.

>>#I don’t actually own a tent at present but yes if you have one even a tent not meant for cold weather stuff will do a lot

I didn’t actually *know* we owned a tent during the 16-hour outage, and Mom apparently didn’t think of it. Shit like this is why I want to inventory the basement and attic.

(she says she inherited it from a retiring Girl Scout leader, and never got a good opportunity to use it for our own troop)


Tags:

#reply via reblog #101 Uses for Infrastructureless Computers #domesticity

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rustingbridges:

ime one of the upsides of gas is that as long as you have gas or electric your home has heat and cooking capability

also I’ve never had a gas outage. presumably they run those underground? whereas I’ve lived in places where you were, at some point, definitely going to have the electric out for hours

 

brin-bellway:

…how is your heat set up? Is that from having a gas stove?

I have an electric stove and a gas furnace (also a gas dryer and water heater), and I would have said the exact opposite: one of the *downsides* of gas is that your heat needs *both* gas and electricity to work, and fails if either is missing.

(Not that gas has ever been missing, true, but “works when electricity is out” is like the *one* major advantage combustion-based heating can have, and it can’t even fucking do *that*. It had one job! What am I paying all this carbon for, if not that?!)

(I can*not* fucking wait to get a heat pump and some hybrid solar.)

 

rustingbridges:

huh, TIL. has this always been the case? most of my lengthy power outage memories occur the late 90s / early 00s and the furnace might have been old at the time.

maybe the kerosene space heater people are right after all

What am I paying all this carbon for, if not that?!

my understanding is that vs resistive heating you’re not paying carbon, since gas furnaces are extremely efficient. heat pumps can change this equation, yeah

My furnace is from 1990. I doubt it’s very efficient; it should, however, give pretty accurate results regarding “what things were like in the late 90s”.

We had a 16-hour power outage in late December a few years back, and it got pretty cold in the house. (Though the downward slope over time was shallower than I would have expected: I guess our insulation is better than I thought.)

I’m not sure what you mean about not paying carbon relative to–oh, are you assuming the electricity is *also* produced by burning gas? We’re mostly nuclear and hydro around here, though with a minority of natural gas.

>>maybe the kerosene space heater people are right after all

I’ve thought about it, but I’d rather not risk it. My current plan for extended cold-weather power outages is to set up a family-sized tent in my kitchen (the only large enough open space for it) and pile on the insulation.


Tags:

#reply via reblog #domesticity #101 Uses for Infrastructureless Computers


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