maryellencarter:

thoughts on Justice League Animated, part two of god knows what:

* The Brave and the Bold: Story by Paul Dini, script by Dwayne McDuffie, who are both fucking great, but this one doesn’t really stand up for me. It’s the one where Gorilla Grodd, a telepathic talking gorilla mad scientist supervillain, attempts to nuke Gorilla City, the hidden African city of hyperintelligent talking gorillas. I think part of my distaste for this episode – it’s not strong enough to be dislike, it’s just not one of the ones I bother with – is just the fact that, you know, over in Marvel the hidden hyper-advanced society in Africa is Wakanda, home of never-conquered black people, and here it’s fucking *gorillas* and that has a very racist smell to me.

* Fury: In which an adopted Amazon tries to kill all the men on Earth with a biowarfare deal. Somehow this works on Superman and J’onn also, despite alien physiology stuff. Also literally no one including Batman wears any PPE despite a worldwide pandemic raging, which hits different these days for sure. Script is again by Dwayne McDuffie, who was one of the greats, and it tries to point out that excluding men completely is not so very far from getting rid of the men, but it also tries to pull the #notallmen thing where one man’s good action in the past is supposed to redeem the whole category, and it’s just… many kinds of not great. One redeeming feature is that at least it does make Hawkgirl the one to set foot on Themiscyra, while in the previous Themiscyra episode Hawkgirl was *completely absent* so the heroes Wonder Woman brought to help were *all* male (for which she got banished).

Now I apparently have a therapy appointment, so more later.

>>Also literally no one including Batman wears any PPE despite a worldwide pandemic raging, which hits different these days for sure.

I watch CinemaSins videos while I’m jogging, because they’re reasonably entertaining and they have subtitles (I can’t hear the video very clearly over the sound of the treadmill). A few weeks ago I saw the one they did on The Happening.

I don’t think he even sinned it (the video was done in the 2010s), but it struck *me*, watching these clips, that I didn’t see *anybody* attempting any kind of air filtration in the face of this incredibly-deadly probably-airborne poison.

Nobody had a surgical mask. The Crazy Prepper People™ getting out their guns didn’t have respirators. Nobody so much as tied a fucking bandana around their face on the grounds that they had nothing to lose by trying.

It’s all-too-realistic, it seems, that *most* people wouldn’t. But there would be exceptions! And the thing is, you could write some really good, really horrifying horror about the exceptions!

Consider this alternate backbone plot for The Happening:

There’s a family. They live far enough from the epicentre to hear about the Happening before it reaches them, but near enough to be in acute danger.

They have one child. Let’s say she’s twelve. Old enough to comprehend the situation about as well as the adults do, old enough to wear PPE sized for adults, young enough to ping people’s Bad Things That Happen to Children Are Extra Bad wiring.

The dad’s a construction worker. He owns a respirator for work. As they’re preparing to evacuate, he gives it to his daughter. He figures, they say whatever this thing is seems to be airborne, maybe the respirator will protect her.

It *does* protect her. But the family only had one.

She watches her parents die by their own hands. She has to find a way to evacuate on her own, without being overwhelmed by the incredibly traumatic experience she just went through, while knowing that if she takes her respirator (Dad’s respirator) off for any reason–eating, drinking, blowing her nose after crying–she’ll die just like they did.

She takes a breath, acutely aware that two inches ago the air she’s breathing in was deadly. The filtered air is like a desert. The clock on dying of thirst is ticking.


Tags:

#I don’t like horror but I also don’t like missed opportunities #The Happening #reply via reblog #reactionblogging #fanfic #story ideas I will never write #illness tw #poison cw #death tw #suicide cw #covid19 #101 Uses for Infrastructureless Computers #sexism cw #racism cw? #Justice League

claudiapriscus:

marithlizard:

siniristiriita:

I keep thinking about that post about the whole genre of movies about a white guy getting into an asian philosophy, matrial art etc and then proceeding to surpass his teacher and be the best ever at it, and I started thinking about the opposite of it.

 I want a movie about a chinese dude who comes to Finland, downs an entire bottle of Koskenkorva, tries to fight a nearby cow and ends up lying face down in a ditch while sobbing about his ex wife and having like 5 finnish dudes staring at him in awe like

 “That’s him. That’s the chosen one.”

The 5 finnish dudes bring him home with them.  The next day, the chinese dude wakes up on the couch with a mighty hangover.   He turns on the TV and for the first time in his life sees Moomintroll.  Instant spiritual bonding experience.  Overcome with emotion,  he begins to sing an ode to Snufkin in a high clear tenor voice. The 5 finnish dudes hastily call their live-in wise old mentor.  “Yes,” says the mentor after watching chinese dude for a few minutes.  “The prophecy was true.  This is the chosen one.  This man…will be our 2020 Eurovision act.”

Having seen Eurovision… This seems entirely credible. Would read.


Tags:

#anything that makes me laugh this much deserves a reblog #Eurovision #story ideas I will never write #racism cw? #alcohol mention

wingdingsandbrokenstrings:

triptocaines:

nigecha:

whats it with people calling japanese characters from japanese anime who live in japan and speak japanese and have japanese names white

#Seriously if a character is supposed to be white they will be named WHITIE MCWHITERSON #and wear an american flag hoodie shirt pants socks underwear and scream stuff in english every 5 seconds

31fcc0367e970c0de648048521373571a6c0e0d7

Tags:

#anything that makes me laugh this much deserves a reblog #home of the brave #racism cw?

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mugasofer:

brin-bellway:

justice-turtle:

biscuitsarenice:

Black and British: A Forgotten History 

Francis Barber’s descendant Cedric Barber [x] [x]

#kind of perpetually surprised that this is surprising #generations and genetics happen? #smaller phenotype populations are mixed into the larger ones #this doesn’t mean they magically disappeared #or were never there

I don’t know about the British perspective, but coming to it as a white USian raised in Southern culture, I think at least some of the reason this isn’t obvious to a lot of people is that we do have that history of blood quantum, of tracking whether someone was one-eighth or one-sixteenth black and refusing them civil rights, of basically forcing the black community to intermarry among themselves, so that they *didn’t* mix out and disappear this way. (Of course, there were also a lot more black folks in USia than there ever were in Britain, I’m not saying that’s the only reason. Just, I think that is a part of the perspective I’m personally coming from. *thinking out loud*)

As a white USian raised in *Northern* culture, I’m not surprised by the intermarriage thing, but I *am* surprised by this clip nonetheless. The surprising thing is that they portray *positively* this guy having an Emotional Connection to His Ancestral Culture because of someone from *five generations back*.

Once you get to smaller fractions than one-quarter or so, having Emotional Connections like that stops being Celebrating Your Heritage and starts being Failing to Stay in Your Lane. The “white person who makes a big deal out of being 1/32 Cherokee” is a *negative* archetype.

As it happens, I too have a black former-slave great-great-great-grandfather (and likewise no black ancestry more recent than that). I don’t have an Emotional Connection about this, but…like, you have no reason to believe me when I say that, because I would say it regardless of whether it were true. You bet your ass I wouldn’t dare openly claim a Connection: it would be seen as cheating, as trying to claim the advantages of being black while skipping out on the disadvantages.

That’s interesting; maybe I’ve been primed by the above, but I would not view you having an Emotional Connection to your former-slave ancestor …

… depending on the form of the connection, of course. It would be weird if you literally identified as nonwhite (I think this is the point of the “1/32 Cherokee” thing?)

Well, I *am* Schrodinger’s White†, but that’s not from the one-drop black, it’s from the one-half Ashkenazi.

(But even then I try to avoid doing anything that even *suggests* claiming non-white-ness, partly because I suspect I would lose the ensuing argument over whether I deserve the privileges (so to speak) of that rank (I pretty much always collapse to white, since I’m pretty much always observed by people for whom that’s the lower-status answer), partly because–as someone who has literally never experienced anti-Semitism–playing the Jew card feels dishonest and distasteful, and partly because I think encouraging the idea of Judaism as innate is counterproductive (I want religion exit rights, mostly on general principles but with a side of “if I ever somehow *do* fall into the hands of people who think Judaism is a disease, I want them to think it’s a *curable* disease so I can let them cure me and survive”).)

“Oh, but it’s a different *form* of connection” reads to me as an excuse from someone who *was* trying for a best-of-two-worlds power-grab and is backpedalling now that they’ve realised they aren’t going to get away with it. Mind you, I *am* fairly paranoid and *do* have a tendency to see power struggles where they may or may not actually exist.

†When I am observed, the waveform collapses into whichever answer is lower-status by the observer’s standards.


Tags:

#*knocks on wood* #reply via reblog #our roads may be golden or broken or lost #racism cw? #anti-semitism cw? #Judaism #inb4 someone blames my hierarchical thinking on my germophobia #(also tbh I don’t *like* talking about Judaism pretty much at all) #(even mentioning it can feel like encouraging people to see it as a Big Deal) #(when really I want it to be at most a Little Deal)

Banana Ripeness Tiers

guardians-of-the-food:

How do y’all eat your bananas?
1-5 anything else is gonna be baked or ice cream or smoothiefied

 

ainawgsd:

1-6. 7 or 8 maybe if I had a strong craving. Anything past that is inedible unless mashed and used as an ingredient in something

 

bilbo-swwaggins:

Noah fence but 1-5 is unripe you ignorant fucks

 

faun-songs:

4-7, 8 is pressing it.

 

absua:

White culture is eating unripe bananas.

 

artgroupie:

1-5?! i don’t go anywhere near under 8 unless it’s my only choice. ideal is 9-12

 

valsdas:

“8 is pressing it” i am… disgusted.gif

 

poison-liker:

i exclusively eat unripened bananas, on pizza

 

zephronias:

8,9,19. You all are weak.

 

captaindibbzy:

5 to 10 is my ideal.

 

xserpx:

8-11. They’re only good when they start getting little brown spots.

 

apprenticebard:

6-11. 9 is ideal.

Supposedly I had a great-grandfather who ate one entirely black banana every day, and who lived into his nineties, so I don’t think the overripe ones will hurt me, but after a certain point they taste weird. So once you get to 12, you have to make banana bread.

 

tchtchtchtchtch:

6 is the perfect sweet spot where it’s a nice vibrant yellow and perfectly ripe and doesn’t have any brown yet. So, that if I can, otherwise as close to it as possible.

 

another-normal-anomaly:

3-7, unripe bananas for the win. Also as per upthread I would be fascinated to find out if this is correlated with a) race or b) national origin. I mean, enjoyment of capsaicin and enjoyment of lots and lots of sugar are both correlated with national origin IIRC, so maybe banana preference is too.

Ideal banana: 11

Good banana: 10, 12, 13

Tolerable-but-I’d-rather-not banana: 9, 14, 15

Inedible banana: 8 and below

If it still has even the faintest trace of green, it’s not ripe enough.

Race: White*

National origin: United States (northeast)

Enjoyment of capsaicin: no

Enjoyment of lots and lots of sugar: not nearly as much as I used to, maybe just one “lot”

*Your mileage may vary. Some terms and conditions may apply. Your whiteness may be revoked at any time without notice.


Tags:

#food #survey #reply via reblog #(tbh ”is Brin white” has much the same answer as ”is Brin queer”) #(nobody can agree on the object-level answer but everyone agrees that I’m low-status) #our roads may be golden or broken or lost #(tangentially) #racism cw? #home of the brave

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sinesalvatorem:

brin-bellway:

sinesalvatorem:

brin-bellway:

@sinesalvatorem

The previous thread was getting a bit long and topic-drifty, so I’m putting this here.

The band “Shame and Scandal” borrowed some instruments from. (Wikipedia says this is not technically prog rock, but more the stuff that prog rock evolved out of. *shrug* Prog rock’s not my area. I liked Genesis a lot better after they sold out.)

(Naming genres in general is not really my area. I’m used to the kind of mishmash of pop, rock, and maybe occasional dips into electronica like you hear played in the background in grocery stores*, in which the primary thing that distinguishes one type of music from another is age rather than genre. That’s why I included decades in my categorisations.)

(That’s also why it’s possible for a song from the 1980′s to sound late 50′s/early 60′s, or a song from the 2010′s to sound late 70′s/early 80′s. Both of those songs were deliberately trying to sound earlier than they were, and it works.)

God, I know I’ve heard songs so much like “Obeah Wedding”, but I’m having a hard time thinking of any. I don’t specifically seek them out, and they aren’t distinctive the way “Light My Fire” is.

Hmm. They mostly phased out 50′s stuff from the radio rotations in the late 00′s**, and since I don’t seek it out, I haven’t heard it much in quite a while.

I’m going to play the opening instrumental of “Obeah Wedding” to my mother and ask her what songs it reminds her of. That might help.

[…]

…well, she said her first associations were cruises and Mexico and Florida, so in other words she’s too close to the mark to be helpful. She did suggest big-band stuff from the 40′s, though, and–once I told her what the song was–pointed out that I would be familiar with this calypso song. That one sounds very different to me, though (and not fitting into any established category in my head, I think).

While I can’t seem to find anything suitable, I can tell you that I think a lot of what my brain is going off of here is “slower-paced song with lots of horns”. Although I suspect there’s some more subtle stuff going on too.

“Rally Round the West Indies”: again, I swear I’ve heard similar stuff, but I’m not sure what. Some part of me is insisting “The Same Moon”, but when I put them side-by-side it doesn’t seem right. (They have kind of similar minor background instruments, I think, and that’s probably what that part of me is latching on to.) Another part says “Dance into the Light”***, which is kind of similar in the horns but not quite right overall (and might be cheating, because I suspect he might be trying to sound vaguely tropical in that one).

Overall, this was a lot harder than I thought it would be. Recognition-vs-recall issues, maybe. I’ll try to keep an ear out when listening to radio, see if I can spot something suitable.

*Well, probably not your grocery stores. But I know you’ve been in Canadian grocery stores, and probably American ones too. That stuff.

**Which is a suspicious timing. It may actually be that America just plays more 50′s stuff than Canada does, and it only seems like late 00′s because that’s when I moved.

*** /sees some of the music video while getting a Youtube version to link/ …god, Phil Collins is such a dork. I love him, but he’s a dork.

These are cool! However, with the exception of Shake Senora (which is actual Calypso), they all read to me as “Old American music of unspecified genre”, and I wouldn’t associate them mentally with any of the Calypso songs I linked. Huh.

Maybe you associate Calypso with rock but don’t have this association with its descendant genre (Soca)? This would be weird to me, because I feel like Calypso is more distinctly itself, while Soca borrows a lot. But IDK how your algorithm works. What do you think of these songs:

“Geelay”: 2010’s (possibly also late 00’s) music-to-dance-to, whatever the proper term for that would be. I have never been in a nightclub, but from what I’ve heard of them I would expect to hear stuff with this sort of sound. I do know from experience that it’s commonly played on radio stations aimed at adolescents; may be heard in grocery stores at times of day/week when students tend to shop, as well as at coffeeshops and fast-food restaurants at any time of day.

Ignoring the lyrics (with their geographical references), I would not have guessed it was from the Caribbean, but I probably would have guessed that black people made it.

Like the 50’s stuff, I vaguely enjoy but don’t seek out this kind of music. They kind of all blend together in my head (doesn’t help that they tend towards mostly-unintelligible lyrics), and I can’t pick out any specific examples of the category. (Except “On the Floor”, which is helped memorability-wise by having so many of its lines end with “on the floor”, but I suspect outside of the radio-playlist context that song doesn’t sound like another piece of the same puzzle.)

Well, the nice thing about still being on the radio a lot is that I can just turn on a radio for a bit and have a decent shot at getting something suitable.

[a few minutes later]

Okay, so I skipped around a couple youth-oriented radio stations, found a song just starting whose beginning sounded promising, I looked it up on Wikipedia, and guess what?

It’s a fucking dancehall song.

…well. I don’t really know what to say, at this point.

(…I’m beginning to wonder how much of the tendency towards unintelligible lyrics is because they’re actually singing in creole.)

“Far From Finished”: Same. Maybe a tad more electronic, but still definitely in the category of “things I would hear at Tim Hortons”.

“Lip Service”: Verging from the above category into rap, but I’m sure my definition of “rap” is overly broad from growing up in a subculture with a very tense relationship with black-dominated music genres. The definition of “rap” I absorbed was a metonym for the kinds of music you were supposed to dislike in a Definitely Not Racist, I Just Don’t Like Newfangled Stuff, You Can’t Prove Anything way. (I definitely don’t have a grasp of the distinction between rap and hip-hop, for one.)

“Find Yuh Way”: for some reason, this specifically evokes “bowling alley” to me rather than “coffeeshop” or “grocery store with lots of younger customers”. I don’t think I’ve been in a bowling alley since this song came out, though, so it’s probably not me subconsciously remembering having heard this song in a bowling alley.

“Jammin Sake”: Same as the first two. I’m getting a few “vaguely tropical” vibes, but I suspect that might be priming/[thinking to look for it], and if I heard this song at Tim Hortons it would not seem out of place.

Tell you what, here’s an Internet stream of the station I got that dancehall from. You might want to try it and see what you get.

(Folk-influenced rock is also very popular these days, though, so I wouldn’t be surprised if you get some of that.)

I could totally see you having accidentally listened to Soca without noticing due to inability to parse the lyrics. Probably way more true of Dancehall, though. Dancehall and Soca have similar relationships to their parent genres (Reggae and Calypso, respectively) in being a dancier, clubbier, pop-infused version. After all, Dancehall is meant to be listened to at the dancehall (ie: dance club).

However, afaik, Calypso songs have only ever been popular in the US/Canada when they were explicitly being enjoyed as ~exotic~, while Reggae was actually somewhat popular there for a while. So I’d expect Reggae’s clubby descendant to also be popular. In fact, it’s infected Japan.

So, if you’ve already been exposed to Caribbean musical styles in typical North American environments, this may be why you don’t think of them as distinctly Caribbean. Or something. IDK.

(I may also be biased on how “obviously Caribbean” these songs sound because I can actually understand what the singers are saying, and they sound home-y to me.)

Anyway, I was unable to play the radio station you linked me to, and I’m not sure why. Maybe they don’t broadcast outside of Canada? But, like, when I pressed play, it showed me an advertisement (about health, using kids on a hockey rink for the backdrop, because so Canada) before cutting off.

It could be geo-locked, but I do find when testing it that I have to press the play button two or three times before it actually starts streaming. (I didn’t get an ad, though.)

I scrolled down, and towards the bottom of the page, to the right of their street address and phone numbers, is a link to a list of recently played songs (which you could probably then hear on Youtube). Does that one work for you?

(I’m not sure if that URL is a permalink or not, so if it doesn’t work, clicking the “Recently Played” link on the main page might be worth a shot.)


Tags:

#music #reply via reblog #long post #racism cw? #(for earlier post in reblog chain)

{{previous post in sequence}}


sinesalvatorem:

brin-bellway:

@sinesalvatorem

The previous thread was getting a bit long and topic-drifty, so I’m putting this here.

The band “Shame and Scandal” borrowed some instruments from. (Wikipedia says this is not technically prog rock, but more the stuff that prog rock evolved out of. *shrug* Prog rock’s not my area. I liked Genesis a lot better after they sold out.)

(Naming genres in general is not really my area. I’m used to the kind of mishmash of pop, rock, and maybe occasional dips into electronica like you hear played in the background in grocery stores*, in which the primary thing that distinguishes one type of music from another is age rather than genre. That’s why I included decades in my categorisations.)

(That’s also why it’s possible for a song from the 1980′s to sound late 50′s/early 60′s, or a song from the 2010′s to sound late 70′s/early 80′s. Both of those songs were deliberately trying to sound earlier than they were, and it works.)

God, I know I’ve heard songs so much like “Obeah Wedding”, but I’m having a hard time thinking of any. I don’t specifically seek them out, and they aren’t distinctive the way “Light My Fire” is.

Hmm. They mostly phased out 50′s stuff from the radio rotations in the late 00′s**, and since I don’t seek it out, I haven’t heard it much in quite a while.

I’m going to play the opening instrumental of “Obeah Wedding” to my mother and ask her what songs it reminds her of. That might help.

[…]

…well, she said her first associations were cruises and Mexico and Florida, so in other words she’s too close to the mark to be helpful. She did suggest big-band stuff from the 40′s, though, and–once I told her what the song was–pointed out that I would be familiar with this calypso song. That one sounds very different to me, though (and not fitting into any established category in my head, I think).

While I can’t seem to find anything suitable, I can tell you that I think a lot of what my brain is going off of here is “slower-paced song with lots of horns”. Although I suspect there’s some more subtle stuff going on too.

“Rally Round the West Indies”: again, I swear I’ve heard similar stuff, but I’m not sure what. Some part of me is insisting “The Same Moon”, but when I put them side-by-side it doesn’t seem right. (They have kind of similar minor background instruments, I think, and that’s probably what that part of me is latching on to.) Another part says “Dance into the Light”***, which is kind of similar in the horns but not quite right overall (and might be cheating, because I suspect he might be trying to sound vaguely tropical in that one).

Overall, this was a lot harder than I thought it would be. Recognition-vs-recall issues, maybe. I’ll try to keep an ear out when listening to radio, see if I can spot something suitable.

*Well, probably not your grocery stores. But I know you’ve been in Canadian grocery stores, and probably American ones too. That stuff.

**Which is a suspicious timing. It may actually be that America just plays more 50′s stuff than Canada does, and it only seems like late 00′s because that’s when I moved.

*** /sees some of the music video while getting a Youtube version to link/ …god, Phil Collins is such a dork. I love him, but he’s a dork.

These are cool! However, with the exception of Shake Senora (which is actual Calypso), they all read to me as “Old American music of unspecified genre”, and I wouldn’t associate them mentally with any of the Calypso songs I linked. Huh.

Maybe you associate Calypso with rock but don’t have this association with its descendant genre (Soca)? This would be weird to me, because I feel like Calypso is more distinctly itself, while Soca borrows a lot. But IDK how your algorithm works. What do you think of these songs:

“Geelay”: 2010’s (possibly also late 00’s) music-to-dance-to, whatever the proper term for that would be. I have never been in a nightclub, but from what I’ve heard of them I would expect to hear stuff with this sort of sound. I do know from experience that it’s commonly played on radio stations aimed at adolescents; may be heard in grocery stores at times of day/week when students tend to shop, as well as at coffeeshops and fast-food restaurants at any time of day.

Ignoring the lyrics (with their geographical references), I would not have guessed it was from the Caribbean, but I probably would have guessed that black people made it.

Like the 50’s stuff, I vaguely enjoy but don’t seek out this kind of music. They kind of all blend together in my head (doesn’t help that they tend towards mostly-unintelligible lyrics), and I can’t pick out any specific examples of the category. (Except “On the Floor”, which is helped memorability-wise by having so many of its lines end with “on the floor”, but I suspect outside of the radio-playlist context that song doesn’t sound like another piece of the same puzzle.)

Well, the nice thing about still being on the radio a lot is that I can just turn on a radio for a bit and have a decent shot at getting something suitable.

[a few minutes later]

Okay, so I skipped around a couple youth-oriented radio stations, found a song just starting whose beginning sounded promising, I looked it up on Wikipedia, and guess what?

It’s a fucking dancehall song.

…well. I don’t really know what to say, at this point.

(…I’m beginning to wonder how much of the tendency towards unintelligible lyrics is because they’re actually singing in creole.)

“Far From Finished”: Same. Maybe a tad more electronic, but still definitely in the category of “things I would hear at Tim Hortons”.

“Lip Service”: Verging from the above category into rap, but I’m sure my definition of “rap” is overly broad from growing up in a subculture with a very tense relationship with black-dominated music genres. The definition of “rap” I absorbed was a metonym for the kinds of music you were supposed to dislike in a Definitely Not Racist, I Just Don’t Like Newfangled Stuff, You Can’t Prove Anything way. (I definitely don’t have a grasp of the distinction between rap and hip-hop, for one.)

“Find Yuh Way”: for some reason, this specifically evokes “bowling alley” to me rather than “coffeeshop” or “grocery store with lots of younger customers”. I don’t think I’ve been in a bowling alley since this song came out, though, so it’s probably not me subconsciously remembering having heard this song in a bowling alley.

“Jammin Sake”: Same as the first two. I’m getting a few “vaguely tropical” vibes, but I suspect that might be priming/[thinking to look for it], and if I heard this song at Tim Hortons it would not seem out of place.

Tell you what, here’s an Internet stream of the station I got that dancehall from. You might want to try it and see what you get.

(Folk-influenced rock is also very popular these days, though, so I wouldn’t be surprised if you get some of that.)


Tags:

#music #North Americans are…less exotic creatures than previously believed? #I wouldn’t be surprised if I’ve accidentally been listening to soca for years without noticing #reply via reblog #long post #racism cw?


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nonternary:

sinesalvatorem:

@ilzolende​ mentioned that people asked to pet their hair at the Solstice. I said there was a good chance that more people would have asked to touch mine, because of the uniqueness. They said that there was actually a good chance that fewer people would ask because of the cause of the uniqueness.

So, fwiw, I like having my hair touched, once I have warning that it’s about to happen and don’t reflexively duck and block anyone trying to touch me. So, if I meet you irl and you want to touch my hair, go ahead and ask. I won’t call you racist.


…Actually, now that I think about it, there is a reasonable chance I will call you racist for something. It’s a habit from back home. I’m from a majority-black country where no one really takes the idea of racism seriously. As such, jokes about people being racist for innocuous things are the norm.

I have called people racist for saying “all X look the same” when they were talking about oranges or action movies. I have asked “Is it because I’m black?” when people have asked if I’d prefer Coke to Pepsi. The thing is, these were all jokes aimed at other black people, in a mostly-black culture, where no one took the idea of racism seriously. The most common reaction to “Is it because I’m black?” was always “Yes”. The reaction to “all X look the same” comments was “Yes, they do, and black people too”.

I may have to change this habit if I’m going to stay in North America. In my first week here, I called a Canadian racist for saying that all apples look the same. This… Did not go as expected. At all. It ended with us apologising profusely to each other and feeling mutually guilty.

On the bright side, if I can apologise at someone while they’re apologising at me and end up in a spiral of “I’m sorry!” “No, I’m sorry!”, there may yet be hope for me becoming a True Canadian.


So, for future reference: If I actually think you did something that was racist and bad, expect me to say “What you did was harmful because…”. If I say “That was racist”, you may assume with 90% confidence that I’m joking. I just wasn’t raised to take anything that begins with “That’s racist” seriously.

“In my first week here, I called a Canadian racist for saying that all apples look the same. This… Did not go as expected. At all. It ended with us apologising profusely to each other and feeling mutually guilty.” Alison/Canada OTP

Canada<–Alison–>Sunlight love triangle


Tags:

#reply via reblog

aceofwands:

capriceandwhimsy:

aceofwands:

Saw another post on the DS9 tag praising the scene in By Inferno’s Light where Martok and Worf totally respect Garak for going into the crawlspace despite his claustrophobia, and say how brave it is of him.

And it got me thinking about that douche who thought Data wouldn’t make a good captain in Unification because ‘You wouldn’t see a Klingon as a counsellor’ (or a … whatever his other example was) – and I’m convinced he’s 100% wrong, and that a Klingon is as likely as any other race to be a counsellor.

Really, it’s all tied back to the ridiculous assumption (which TNG unfortunately seemed to perpetuate at times) that every single Klingon in the entire Empire is a warrior (never mind that we’ve seen Klingon scientists and judges and more) and therefore lol don’t be silly they don’t have any mental health professionals of any kind. Yeah, cause that makes sense.

As if a Klingon counsellor wouldn’t see helping their patients overcome their mental illnesses as a worthy battle. 

If Martok and Worf can recognise the bravery in fighting internal fears, then there’s no reason to think that other Klingons wouldn’t feel the same.

So in conclusion, I now really want to see/read about a Klingon counsellor.

“Tell me about your fear,” Dugath said.

The Klingon youth sitting in the chair across from him shuffled nervously, eyes downcast, before looking up at the older Klingon with a practiced sneer. “There is no fear,” the youth said. “I am a warrior. Warriors do not know fear.”

“Then you are a fool,” Dugath growled. “Fear is what keeps a warrior alive. Fear tells him that danger is near, and that his life is in danger. A warrior should not be ruled by fear, but neither should he deny it.”

The youth remained silent. “To admit your fear takes great courage,” Dugath said. “Perhaps more courage than leaping into battle against many foes: for the only foe you now face lies within you, where no blade can pierce.”

The youth’s lower lip trembled, but he stilled it with a supreme force of will. “I dream of the night on Vikoth Nine,” he admitted at last.

“The night when you won your battle honors? The night of which the others still celebrate in song?” Dugath asked.

“They should not celebrate what is not deserved!” the youth growled. “There was no courage in my killing of the Romulans. Only fear and luck. Why do they sing songs of my courage, when so many more courageous and worthy warriors remain unspoken?”

Ah, thought Dugath. Much becomes clear. The face of my enemy is revealed.

The old Klingon said a silent prayer to Kahless as he prepared to do battle against the troubles infesting the youth’s mind, as he prepared to use all his courage and skill to polish and sharpen the blade that was a warrior’s soul.

Ohhhh Kahless, someone actually wrote something based on my offhand idea from a few weeks ago?!

THIS IS FANTASTIC~! And exactly how I picture a Klingon therapy session <3 <3


Tags:

#Star Trek #fanfic #hat-tip to cosmictuesdays for linking me this