thcgay:

clodiuspulcher:

bauliya:

bauliya:

everyone’s like wehhhhh why doesn’t doctor house gets suuuueeed! like my man. literally every patient he sees is someone that’s been trying to find a diagnosis for ages. i could live with a little medical malpractice if it were coming from someone ready to break into my home to look for allergens and not simply half heartedly listen to me before suggesting I lose weight and take ages of back and forth arguing to order a single test

“it’s medical malpractice” have u ever been a doctor? most medicine is malpractice. let the man limp around chewing vicodin doing 50 invasive tests please

Once Taub (derogatory) derisively said about a patient with unexplained chronic pain “7 doctors couldn’t find anything wrong with him, what does that mean?” and House replied without even thinking “it means they’re idiots” and proceed to work his ass off to diagnose the patient Taub wanted to write off as a faker or something. If a doctor had said that when that patient was ME, I wouldn’t dream of suing them in a million years

f2595ba210e994c64eeac12ad8e31ebf23b32f70

Tags:

#House #anything that makes me laugh this much deserves a reblog #((this amusement not to be taken as expressing an opinion regarding the statement itself)) #high context jokes #medical cw #this probably deserves some other warning tag but I am not sure what #discourse cw?

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brin-bellway:

paradigm-adrift:

In the last 3 years I got tinnitus, feeling like I’m suffocating, and joint pain added to my moment-to-moment suffering. That’s 1 constant burden added per year. Let alone the several other minor things breaking during that time that I notice daily but not constantly.

At this rate I’ll have about 50 problems as bad as tinnitus weighing on me at any given moment by the end of my expected life span. Actually, rumor has it that new problems accelerate as you get older rather than showing up at a constant rate, so if the last 3 years aren’t a fluke, 50 could be too optimistic.

But that can’t possibly be true, right? Yeah, aging is bad, but if it were that bad people would get almost-universally institutionalized indefinitely in their 40s as the constant torture accumulates, probably, and that clearly isn’t the case. It’s gotta be better than what my gut instinct suggests the future will be like, right?

Right?

I used to wonder about this myself (right down to the annual frequency), and from my experience thus far it seems like at least part of the answer is: not all long-lasting problems are permanent. They sometimes mysteriously *disappear* just as they mysteriously appeared.

I’m not prone to earwax clogs anymore (as I was for roughly a decade). I don’t get waves of stomach pain every night around 12:50 AM anymore (several years). I usually don’t have an itching response to my own sweat anymore (~two years). I tried stopping my use of dandruff shampoo recently to see if the dandruff would come back, and so far it *hasn’t*.

(This isn’t even counting the late-onset dysmenorrhea, the chronic constipation, or the once-frequent rashes on the backs of my hands, for all of which the underlying tendency is still there but very well-controlled.)

I’m not *planning around* the possibility that, say, my ability to breathe unfiltered outdoor non-winter air will someday return, but I acknowledge that it might and I’ll gladly accept the bonus to my expected quality-of-life if it does.

#A good answer! #Thank you. (paradigm-adrift)


Tags:

#conversational aglets #is the blue I see the same as the blue you see #aging cw #medical cw #illness tw? #injury cw? #venting cw?

paradigm-adrift:

In the last 3 years I got tinnitus, feeling like I’m suffocating, and joint pain added to my moment-to-moment suffering. That’s 1 constant burden added per year. Let alone the several other minor things breaking during that time that I notice daily but not constantly.

At this rate I’ll have about 50 problems as bad as tinnitus weighing on me at any given moment by the end of my expected life span. Actually, rumor has it that new problems accelerate as you get older rather than showing up at a constant rate, so if the last 3 years aren’t a fluke, 50 could be too optimistic.

But that can’t possibly be true, right? Yeah, aging is bad, but if it were that bad people would get almost-universally institutionalized indefinitely in their 40s as the constant torture accumulates, probably, and that clearly isn’t the case. It’s gotta be better than what my gut instinct suggests the future will be like, right?

Right?

I used to wonder about this myself (right down to the annual frequency), and from my experience thus far it seems like at least part of the answer is: not all long-lasting problems are permanent. They sometimes mysteriously *disappear* just as they mysteriously appeared.

I’m not prone to earwax clogs anymore (as I was for roughly a decade). I don’t get waves of stomach pain every night around 12:50 AM anymore (several years). I usually don’t have an itching response to my own sweat anymore (~two years). I tried stopping my use of dandruff shampoo recently to see if the dandruff would come back, and so far it *hasn’t*.

(This isn’t even counting the late-onset dysmenorrhea, the chronic constipation, or the once-frequent rashes on the backs of my hands, for all of which the underlying tendency is still there but very well-controlled.)

I’m not *planning around* the possibility that, say, my ability to breathe unfiltered outdoor non-winter air will someday return, but I acknowledge that it might and I’ll gladly accept the bonus to my expected quality-of-life if it does.


Tags:

#reply via reblog #is the blue I see the same as the blue you see #aging cw #medical cw #illness tw? #injury cw? #venting cw?


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the-dao-of-the-zerg:

garmbreak1:

look man, life is hard and the rules of society are complex

but let people off the fuckin train before you try to get on

and don’t play your goddamn music on your phone speakers in public

Genuinely curious: Why is music treated so much worse than conversation? If the norm was to actually be quiet on the bus, that would be one thing, but I see people primarily single out “music” without even mentioning loud conversations and such.

(I’m guilty of this too – I would never dream of playing music out loud, but get me excited and I will lose all awareness of how loud I’m talking)

Because music *is* worse than conversation. More distracting (consumes more mental processing power), and with potentially much deeper valleys of unpleasantness.

I can only assume that mileage must vary on this, though, given that store background radios are not just legal but *encouraged*.

(Even my *dentist* has a background radio. I was afraid to point out the risk of [them getting distracted by the music at a crucial moment and fucking up a procedure] for fear of self-fulfilling-prophecies/centipede’s-dilemmas. Possibly I should have at least pointed out that playing lowest-common-denominator pop music while performing potentially invasive medical procedures on people risks giving them PTSD *with extremely common triggers*: that issue seems incredibly obvious to *me*, but then I have relevant experience and perhaps it’s not obvious otherwise.)


Tags:

#we should fine the shit out of stores with background radios #you can be allowed to turn a profit once you’ve proven you can be trusted with public soundscapes #reply via reblog #music #is the blue I see the same as the blue you see #medical cw #this probably deserves some other warning tag but I am not sure what #infohazards?

Vaccination round two (actually round three)

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finestoftheflavors:

Walgreens says they’ll add multiple vaccinations into a single shot! They show a big list of vaccinations! I didn’t know some of these existed yesterday! Gotta admit, I’m a slightly tempted to just get everything even if there’s no practical value to it. Is there any reason why I would not want to do that? I know older people with little impact craters on their arms where they got the smallpox shot back in the day, so a least some vaccines aren’t as simple and painless as the covid19 one is… would they leave it off this list if it was a potentially serious one, like if getting vaccine for yellow fever could harm somebody then maybe they wouldn’t let me just get it all willy nilly when I’m not actually at risk of tropical diseases. I don’t actually know!

  • COVID-19
  • Pneumonia (Pneumococcal)
  • Shingles (Herpes Zoster)
  • Tdap (Whooping Cough)
  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Cholera (Vaxchora)
  • HPV (Human Papillomavirus)
  • Hepatitis A (Hep A)
  • Hepatitis A/Hepatitis B (combination)
  • Hepatitis B (Hep B)
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella)
  • Meningitis (Meningococcal)
  • Polio
  • Rabies
  • Td (Tetanus, Diphtheria)
  • Typhoid
  • Yellow Fever

I know I got whatever was considered standard childhood vaccinations when I was a kid, and I know that included MMR, but I honestly don’t remember if that included anything else on the list. Whooping cough is one of those diseases that kids don’t get anymore, presumably I’ve got that one maybe? Better check on that.

Walgreens apparently will not let me get a booster with a different brand name, those bastards. They say “CDC recommends getting the same brand” and then link to the CDC page that does in fact say getting mix-n-match boosters is okay. Apparently CVS is cool with it? I think I’ll just sign up for the covid19 and flu combo for now.

 

rustingbridges:

what’s this? an opportunity to get myself injected with an unwise medley of juices?

color me intrigued

 

rustingbridges:

alright but I unironically want several of these for Actual Reasons besides The Juice. how much is too much

 

necarion:

Pro-vaccine advice: don’t get all of these vaccines

You really shouldn’t get the cholera vaccine, unless you’re seriously likely to need the cholera vaccine. It lasts about 3 months, and for the first 2 weeks you have to be super careful about washing your hands because you can transmit cholera to other people (because live attenuated).

TD isn’t needed if you’re getting TDaP (same TD there, plus pertussis).

Rabies only lasts about a year, I think, and it sucks to get unless you really need it. A better rabies vaccine would be great but we really don’t have it. I think there’s something similar with Typhoid; the immunity just doesn’t last.

There are 2 pneumonia vaccines, and you only really need one if you’re over 65 or have serious immune or respiratory issues (ask your doctor). Ditto for shingles; you don’t really need it if you are younger than that and/or had chickenpox after the age of 2 or 3.

The one non-standard one you could seriously consider getting is Yellow Fever, and they generally don’t recommend it unless you’re going to need it. It has a low complication rate, of something like 1/50 to 100M, but does have the possibility of giving you the virus. It’s still one of those we could consider expanding, but we really did wipe it out in the US.

 

necarion:

Adding these tags from @brin-bellway

I added mine to my Word doc where I have all the meds I’m currently taking, plus doses, and the contact info for my past doctors.

The nurses are always super grateful when I just hand them a piece of paper when they ask “what are you taking”, and I don’t have to write it down every time.

 

brin-bellway:

I don’t think my situation has gotten *quite* complicated enough yet to need a standard ref sheet, but I’ll bear that in mind as I get older.

I do write down the details every time I have a new concern, and hand them that when they ask about the purpose of the visit. They seem a little weirded out by it, but they’re willing to go along with it, and I think they’ve been adding the sheets to their file on me.

(In related news, it’s amazing how much more seriously people take you when you have things in writing: nothing says Responsible Adult like a clipboard, apparently. This mostly holds even if you’re using it as assistive tech for your shitty autistic speaking ability and/or your shitty immune system (leading to the use of a high-grade-but-pretty-muffling prosthetic immune system) [link]. It’s a good trick to have in my arsenal, given that I look about 13 and often have trouble getting people to take me seriously in meatspace.)

 

necarion:

Yeah, definitely have a list of things you want addressed. Doubly so for you if you need to be taken seriously, but still singly so for others. They might look at you strangely, but it makes their job easier, and you won’t forget something. Also helps to have your own notes and a bunch of past history and contacts.

I would still highly recommend having a “this is my medication” sheet you can print out whenever you have to see someone new.

I’ll take that under advisement, and I will definitely check the medication section on my smartphone’s emergency screen and make sure I included dosages.

My GP is surprisingly good at code-switching into People Who Actually Gave Their Health Problems Some Serious Thought, so I don’t actually tend to think of “people not taking me seriously” as being a primarily *medical* thing. Still good to have a clipboard handy, though.


Tags:

#reply via reblog #medical cw #illness tw #vaccines

Vaccination round two (actually round three)

{{previous post in sequence}}


finestoftheflavors:

Walgreens says they’ll add multiple vaccinations into a single shot! They show a big list of vaccinations! I didn’t know some of these existed yesterday! Gotta admit, I’m a slightly tempted to just get everything even if there’s no practical value to it. Is there any reason why I would not want to do that? I know older people with little impact craters on their arms where they got the smallpox shot back in the day, so a least some vaccines aren’t as simple and painless as the covid19 one is… would they leave it off this list if it was a potentially serious one, like if getting vaccine for yellow fever could harm somebody then maybe they wouldn’t let me just get it all willy nilly when I’m not actually at risk of tropical diseases. I don’t actually know!

  • COVID-19
  • Pneumonia (Pneumococcal)
  • Shingles (Herpes Zoster)
  • Tdap (Whooping Cough)
  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Cholera (Vaxchora)
  • HPV (Human Papillomavirus)
  • Hepatitis A (Hep A)
  • Hepatitis A/Hepatitis B (combination)
  • Hepatitis B (Hep B)
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella)
  • Meningitis (Meningococcal)
  • Polio
  • Rabies
  • Td (Tetanus, Diphtheria)
  • Typhoid
  • Yellow Fever

I know I got whatever was considered standard childhood vaccinations when I was a kid, and I know that included MMR, but I honestly don’t remember if that included anything else on the list. Whooping cough is one of those diseases that kids don’t get anymore, presumably I’ve got that one maybe? Better check on that.

Walgreens apparently will not let me get a booster with a different brand name, those bastards. They say “CDC recommends getting the same brand” and then link to the CDC page that does in fact say getting mix-n-match boosters is okay. Apparently CVS is cool with it? I think I’ll just sign up for the covid19 and flu combo for now.

 

rustingbridges:

what’s this? an opportunity to get myself injected with an unwise medley of juices?

color me intrigued

 

rustingbridges:

alright but I unironically want several of these for Actual Reasons besides The Juice. how much is too much

 

necarion:

Pro-vaccine advice: don’t get all of these vaccines

You really shouldn’t get the cholera vaccine, unless you’re seriously likely to need the cholera vaccine. It lasts about 3 months, and for the first 2 weeks you have to be super careful about washing your hands because you can transmit cholera to other people (because live attenuated).

TD isn’t needed if you’re getting TDaP (same TD there, plus pertussis).

Rabies only lasts about a year, I think, and it sucks to get unless you really need it. A better rabies vaccine would be great but we really don’t have it. I think there’s something similar with Typhoid; the immunity just doesn’t last.

There are 2 pneumonia vaccines, and you only really need one if you’re over 65 or have serious immune or respiratory issues (ask your doctor). Ditto for shingles; you don’t really need it if you are younger than that and/or had chickenpox after the age of 2 or 3.

The one non-standard one you could seriously consider getting is Yellow Fever, and they generally don’t recommend it unless you’re going to need it. It has a low complication rate, of something like 1/50 to 100M, but does have the possibility of giving you the virus. It’s still one of those we could consider expanding, but we really did wipe it out in the US.

 

necarion:

Adding these tags from @brin-bellway

ce2fbde938547981aa3522d157df88e7af3d910a

I added mine to my Word doc where I have all the meds I’m currently taking, plus doses, and the contact info for my past doctors.

The nurses are always super grateful when I just hand them a piece of paper when they ask “what are you taking”, and I don’t have to write it down every time.

I don’t think my situation has gotten *quite* complicated enough yet to need a standard ref sheet, but I’ll bear that in mind as I get older.

I do write down the details every time I have a new concern, and hand them that when they ask about the purpose of the visit. They seem a little weirded out by it, but they’re willing to go along with it, and I think they’ve been adding the sheets to their file on me.

(In related news, it’s amazing how much more seriously people take you when you have things in writing: nothing says Responsible Adult like a clipboard, apparently. This mostly holds even if you’re using it as assistive tech for your shitty autistic speaking ability and/or your shitty immune system (leading to the use of a high-grade-but-pretty-muffling prosthetic immune system) [link]. It’s a good trick to have in my arsenal, given that I look about 13 and often have trouble getting people to take me seriously in meatspace.)


Tags:

#medical cw #vaccines #transhumanism #reply via reblog #illness tw


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cromulentenough:

comparativelysuperlative:

According to a rumor, you can reduce side effects from the Pfizer vaccine by taking zinc, magnesium, and vitamin D over the week leading up to it. (Supposedly this comes from the German government, but I haven’t seen a source.) It worked for me— second shot went easier than the first.

Obviously I’m not swearing by this, but all three of those are safe and most people are deficient in one of them anyway, so it’s not like there’s a downside.

A TON of people are deficient in vitamin D. Especially if you’re dark skinned, and especially if you live somewhere that doesn’t get a lot of sunlight (so not near the equator basically). and being indoors more than usual because of lockdowns probably doesn’t help. Magnesium IIRC helps with absorbing vitamind D, i don’t know if zinc is unrelated or not. And there’s been a bunch of stuff about low vitamin D making you react worse to getting covid and i guess from this also to just the covid vaccine?


Tags:

#hmm #it’s hard to look into this because the keywords tend to just turn up a bunch of antivax conspiracists #but OP’s second paragraph seems pretty reasonable as long as you check for interactions and don’t take ridiculously high doses #I’m already taking 2000 IU/day of vitamin D and I think Mom has some magnesium pills she’d be willing to share #don’t know if there’s any zinc lying around the household #maybe I’ll eat more…what do I eat if tweaking my diet towards higher-zinc foods…cashews and amaranth #(maybe I should go look into those magnesium pills) #(if my waiting-list experience is anything like Mom’s‚ my vaccination may well turn out to be a week or less from now) #vaccines #medical cw #covid19

slatestarscratchpad:

Today’s lesson on health care economics:

On GoodRx, a month’s worth of sildenafil 20 mg costs $17.25

On the same site, a month’s worth of sildenafil 25 mg costs $507.24

Does anyone buy the 25 mg version? You bet – I saw a patient who was on it yesterday (don’t worry; he’s since been switched over).

What’s going on here? Sildenafil has two FDA approvals – one, under the name “Revatio”, for hypertension. The other, under the name “Viagra”, for – well, you know.

The FDA only approved Revatio at doses of 5 and 20 mg, and only approved Viagra at doses of 25 and 100 mg. So sildenafil 20 mg has “Revatio” on the box and sildenafil 25 mg has “Viagra” on the box. Revatio is generic and dirt-cheap; Viagra is still on-patent and expensive.

But can’t people who want Viagra just buy Revatio?

Yes, totally. But the average patient doesn’t know this is going on. And the average doctor doesn’t really have any incentive to care because they’re not the one buying it (I’ve had patients who have asked their doctor to prescribe the cheaper version, and the doctor has refused because they want to do it the “proper” way). And I think it’s illegal for the insurance companies to insist, because technically the FDA only approved sildenafil 25 mg for erectile dysfunction but didn’t approve sildenafil 20 mg.

(also, some people are like “But I need a higher 50 mg dose of Viagra, and Revatio only goes up to 20 mg!” As the ancient rationalist proverb goes, have you tried thinking about the problem for five minutes?)

At the advice of my doctor, I’m on pseudo-prescription naproxen. Instead of one 500mg prescription pill, I buy the 220mg OTC stuff and take double the dose on the label: it’s close enough, and it’s somewhat cheaper per mg if you don’t have prescription coverage. She said if I ever do get prescription coverage I should let her know and she’ll write me an official prescription then.

I love my doctor.

(Please do not take prescription-strength naproxen without medical supervision: you can fuck up your liver.)

Side benefit:

People in the spring: “it’s horrible that they’re making *chronically ill* people go to a *pharmacy* *every month* and risk plague! patients aren’t allowed to keep buffers of medications they often need to *survive*!”

Me: *looks with a mixture of relief and awkwardness at my 200-pack of Aleve*

(Note: I only need it around the onset of menstruation, so 200 OTC-sized pills is about a ten-month supply.)

(Store-brand naproxen doesn’t come in 200-pack, and the bulk-discount benefit outweighed the name-brand penalty.)


Tags:

#other things my doctor has done: #prescribed prune juice for constipation #prescribed string for skin tags #used Big Pharma ”samples” to keep her poorer patients supplied with meds they would struggle to afford on their own #readily admitted that people in my situation don’t actually need gynecological checkups #and I should only see a gynecologist if something goes wrong or I decide to start having sex #reply via reblog #adventures in human capitalism #medical cw #illness mention #covid19 #menstruation #this probably deserves some other warning tag but I am not sure what

argumate:

discoursedrome:

voxette-vk:

I’ve got to say, it was a pretty funny joke by the government to let people advertise drugs, as long as they fill the whole ad with everything that could possibly go wrong.

those ads where an announced reads a rapidfire list of horrifying side-effects in a soothing drone while the tv shows a happy telegenic family playing are one of America’s most important cultural artifacts and it’s so crucial that they be preserved for future civilizations

*rapid voice* this is not a place of honour. no highly esteemed deed is commemorated here. nothing valued is here. may cause nausea, vomiting, and erectile dysfunction. sending this message was important to us.


Tags:

#medical cw #advertising #anything that makes me laugh this much deserves a reblog #this probably deserves some other warning tag but I am not sure what