sigmaleph:

wingedcatgirl:

603a97b94e8f852d77353a186af21f76ff4568caALT

… took us a second to realize they meant stoves

well, it was ok yesterday, and if it was ok on one day it should also be on the next one, so


Tags:

#first thought: are you telling me they used a picture from an electric-coil stove instead of an actual induction stove and #*didn’t even use a spiral coil*?? #second thought: no actually there’s like a 75% chance you’re not going to be okay #more if you count trauma #third thought‚ after scrolling down: and Sigma’s joke isn’t *either* of the interpretations that came to my mind #how many are we up to now

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brin-bellway:

bending-sickle:

unpretty:

i am in my thirties and have somehow spent my entire life under the impression that the only difference between hard and soft water was that they taste and feel different. and which one you preferred was based entirely on what you were used to. now i find out that hard water is why my clothes get so fucked up so fast. people without hard water don’t agonize over how many times they can wash a soft blanket before it stops being soft. all those years of reading online discussions about how showering should only take five minutes and every other day you should just rinse your hair out with water. my intense confusion because if i try to take a five minute shower i come out looking and feeling dirtier than when i went in. if my hair gets wet in the shower and i don’t shampoo it i come out looking like i fell in the creek. if i gave myself a quick soapy rinse before work and then ran out the door without extensively moisturizing i would be the itchiest bitch alive in five minutes. i just assumed it was a body chemistry thing. now you’re telling me that other people don’t have that. that i am in Special Circumstances because every time i step in the tub i am effectively taking a mineral bath.

don’t get me fucking started on hard water and yes i am writing this right in the post i am so sorry op but where i live we have hard water (there’s a higher Very Hard level) so i would like to rant with you about how showering makes your skin so itchy and how you live and breath dandruff because your scalp is crying and how soap won’t rub off your hands no matter how hard you scrub and how drying yourself with a towel just leaves you clammy and how you have to wipe every surface down to combat the accumulation of limescale even though it doesn’t help so everything is spotted white and how your plants can just start dying because of the shitty shitty water and how you can technically drink tap water but it tastes terrible so you have to go on pilgrimages to mountain towns to get water from their fountains and how, since we’re ranting about shampoo, you think your hair is Irrevocably and Horribly damaged until you go to a city with soft water and wash it there one (1) time and your hair comes out silky and shiny and like a goddamned commercial yes i am still pissed knowing what my hair could be like if only i weren’t washing it with liquidized minerals

I hope I’m not barging in too hard, but I saw this in the notes and I thought I should tell y’all in case nobody has yet:

It’s possible to plumb a water-softening device into your home pipes. I have one, as do most homes in my area.

I’m *guessing* that for y’all there aren’t big displays of softener salt readily available in every grocery store and most convenience stores, otherwise you’d have found out sooner (although it’s also possible you *do* have displays and didn’t notice because you didn’t realise they were relevant to your interests, I could definitely see myself doing that), but some models run off of resin beads instead and only need the resin replaced every few years (possibly at the cost of worse taste than salt-based systems, but I’m not sure about that part).

I was doing some googling on prices recently because mine is getting old and decrepit, and it looks like it’s on the order of a few thousand if you don’t already have your pipes set up for it, or a few hundred to slot in a unit on piping already designed around it. I’m aware that a few grand is a lot of money and that many people don’t have the authority to make those kinds of changes to their homes, but it’s still good to know that it’s *possible* to have soft water without having to move to a naturally-soft area.

#reblogging again for the comments #i feel like i have heard of this contraption but never in this country #and i’m pretty sure if if my unlces had known about it when their house was in construction (decades ago) they’d have set it up #i mean we have houses here that up until recently didn’t build in something as basic as heating #and just slapped the radiators and pipes on after everything was finished #but yeah I don’t think it’s an option here #(and if it were it wouldn’t be because my god thatya lot of money) #thank you reblogger #and now you know


Tags:

#conversational aglets #(I mean technically mine is also retrofitted given that I’m pretty sure my house predates the local water grid) #(but fortunately somebody *else* dealt with that) #PSA #domesticity #the more you know

bending-sickle:

unpretty:

i am in my thirties and have somehow spent my entire life under the impression that the only difference between hard and soft water was that they taste and feel different. and which one you preferred was based entirely on what you were used to. now i find out that hard water is why my clothes get so fucked up so fast. people without hard water don’t agonize over how many times they can wash a soft blanket before it stops being soft. all those years of reading online discussions about how showering should only take five minutes and every other day you should just rinse your hair out with water. my intense confusion because if i try to take a five minute shower i come out looking and feeling dirtier than when i went in. if my hair gets wet in the shower and i don’t shampoo it i come out looking like i fell in the creek. if i gave myself a quick soapy rinse before work and then ran out the door without extensively moisturizing i would be the itchiest bitch alive in five minutes. i just assumed it was a body chemistry thing. now you’re telling me that other people don’t have that. that i am in Special Circumstances because every time i step in the tub i am effectively taking a mineral bath.

don’t get me fucking started on hard water and yes i am writing this right in the post i am so sorry op but where i live we have hard water (there’s a higher Very Hard level) so i would like to rant with you about how showering makes your skin so itchy and how you live and breath dandruff because your scalp is crying and how soap won’t rub off your hands no matter how hard you scrub and how drying yourself with a towel just leaves you clammy and how you have to wipe every surface down to combat the accumulation of limescale even though it doesn’t help so everything is spotted white and how your plants can just start dying because of the shitty shitty water and how you can technically drink tap water but it tastes terrible so you have to go on pilgrimages to mountain towns to get water from their fountains and how, since we’re ranting about shampoo, you think your hair is Irrevocably and Horribly damaged until you go to a city with soft water and wash it there one (1) time and your hair comes out silky and shiny and like a goddamned commercial yes i am still pissed knowing what my hair could be like if only i weren’t washing it with liquidized minerals

I hope I’m not barging in too hard, but I saw this in the notes and I thought I should tell y’all in case nobody has yet:

It’s possible to plumb a water-softening device into your home pipes. I have one, as do most homes in my area.

I’m *guessing* that for y’all there aren’t big displays of softener salt readily available in every grocery store and most convenience stores, otherwise you’d have found out sooner (although it’s also possible you *do* have displays and didn’t notice because you didn’t realise they were relevant to your interests, I could definitely see myself doing that), but some models run off of resin beads instead and only need the resin replaced every few years (possibly at the cost of worse taste than salt-based systems, but I’m not sure about that part).

I was doing some googling on prices recently because mine is getting old and decrepit, and it looks like it’s on the order of a few thousand if you don’t already have your pipes set up for it, or a few hundred to slot in a unit on piping already designed around it. I’m aware that a few grand is a lot of money and that many people don’t have the authority to make those kinds of changes to their homes, but it’s still good to know that it’s *possible* to have soft water without having to move to a naturally-soft area.


Tags:

#we have one (1) hard-water tap for my mom and brother to drink out of #(because for some reason they actually *like* the taste) #everything else is softened #(except for when the softener unit fails to realise that it needs to cycle on because‚ again‚ decrepit) #(in which case I press the on button manually and 15 minutes later it’s fine) #the more you know #our home and cherished land #is the blue I see the same as the blue you see #PSA #domesticity #reply via reblog


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ms-demeanor:

People seem to like that post about fixing computers and the fucked up little components in apple laptops and here is some solid advice on getting started fixing your own equipment:

Start recreationally watching repair videos.

There are a ton of mechanics who have youtube channels that show how they do their troubleshooting process and how they navigate engines. They might put up a video or two a month talking about an overheating problem on one SUV that they can’t track down or on replacing some fuck-off part that’s all the way in the back of an engine.

Teaching people how to troubleshoot is one of the hardest things about any kind of technical repair, and watching professionals zoom in on a problem can teach you that kind of troubleshooting.

You’ll see the process that they go through in trying to replicate the problem; they’ll see which things cause the problem and which things don’t. They’ll see if a problem is persistent or intermittent. They’ll show you their order of operations and how they organize their tools and you’ll learn how they keep bolts in order and how they keep their hands clean.

One of the comments on that other post derides “spudgers” because the commenter doesn’t know what a spudger is (which is fine! it’s a silly word and it is in the screenshot of the parts that I was complaining about! people don’t have to know what that is and I don’t expect them to!) – it’s a narrow tool you use to wedge open the clips on the side of a laptop. Some people use old credit cards for this, I used a jeweler’s screwdriver and I scratched my case. A spudger would have been handy, actually, but a mac-specific “pentalobe” (star) screwdriver is bullshit.

Watch tech repair videos and learn the names of tools. Watch household appliance videos and learn how your fridge works. Even if you don’t have something to repair. Especially if you don’t.

Watch plumbing videos, watch carpentry videos. Watch videos of people removing insulation.

It’s great to watch specific videos when you want to do a specific task, but honestly once you watch ten videos of someone assembling a gaming PC it becomes a whole lot clearer that this is probably something you can do yourself.

Watch ten different people on youtube change their brake pads.

Working on your brakes is one of those things that sounds fucking terrifying until you know exactly how simple brake systems on most cars are.

Even if you don’t have something to work on right now, it is so, so worth it to learn how to tinker around and repair things, and one of the absolute easiest ways to do that is to watch other people doing it and friends, people fucking love putting their repair videos on youtube.


Tags:

#…I *want* to have a better understanding of the hardware around me but also processing A/V input is mentally taxing #and I can see why having video specifically would be helpful here #hmm #I dunno maybe I’ll try it anyway at some point #maybe with captions on so at least I don’t have to process *both* A and V #Youtube auto-captions are pretty fucking good these days so #(you can even have it open a transcript on the side‚ it’s great)

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rustingbridges:

ime one of the upsides of gas is that as long as you have gas or electric your home has heat and cooking capability

also I’ve never had a gas outage. presumably they run those underground? whereas I’ve lived in places where you were, at some point, definitely going to have the electric out for hours

 

brin-bellway:

…how is your heat set up? Is that from having a gas stove?

I have an electric stove and a gas furnace (also a gas dryer and water heater), and I would have said the exact opposite: one of the *downsides* of gas is that your heat needs *both* gas and electricity to work, and fails if either is missing.

(Not that gas has ever been missing, true, but “works when electricity is out” is like the *one* major advantage combustion-based heating can have, and it can’t even fucking do *that*. It had one job! What am I paying all this carbon for, if not that?!)

(I can*not* fucking wait to get a heat pump and some hybrid solar.)

 

rustingbridges:

huh, TIL. has this always been the case? most of my lengthy power outage memories occur the late 90s / early 00s and the furnace might have been old at the time.

maybe the kerosene space heater people are right after all

What am I paying all this carbon for, if not that?!

my understanding is that vs resistive heating you’re not paying carbon, since gas furnaces are extremely efficient. heat pumps can change this equation, yeah

 

brin-bellway:

My furnace is from 1990. I doubt it’s very efficient; it should, however, give pretty accurate results regarding “what things were like in the late 90s”.

We had a 16-hour power outage in late December a few years back, and it got pretty cold in the house. (Though the downward slope over time was shallower than I would have expected: I guess our insulation is better than I thought.)

I’m not sure what you mean about not paying carbon relative to–oh, are you assuming the electricity is *also* produced by burning gas? We’re mostly nuclear and hydro around here, though with a minority of natural gas.

>>maybe the kerosene space heater people are right after all

I’ve thought about it, but I’d rather not risk it. My current plan for extended cold-weather power outages is to set up a family-sized tent in my kitchen (the only large enough open space for it) and pile on the insulation.

 

rustingbridges:

My furnace is from 1990. I doubt it’s very efficient; it should, however, give pretty accurate results regarding “what things were like in the late 90s”.

right, given that furnaces are often quite old it’s possible the furnace in question was from 1970 or something like that.

but also maybe it just never got that cold, the longest outages I can remember were in the summer. there were some fall / winter ones but as I remember it they were less than a day.

are you assuming the electricity is *also* produced by burning gas

not gas necessarily, but yeah that was assuming fossil fuels. typical furnaces are very efficient at turning fuel into heat, as heat is normally the waste product of energy generation and the only trick is to extract as much heat as possible from waste gases that you want to pipe out of the house. whereas with electric heat the waste heat at the power plant is, well, wasted.

but yeah if you have hydro that’s not at all the case.

I’ve thought about it, but I’d rather not risk it

yeah this was mostly a joke. I’ve been around a few kerosene space heaters and they smelled, which I took as a bad sign in addition to fire risk. I don’t think I’d buy one if I had the option of using an electric one.

as an emergency survival plan I’m willing to consign myself to living in cold weather clothes for a while, which I have anyway for cold weather activities

>>given that furnaces are often quite old it’s possible the furnace in question was from 1970 or something like that

I’d heard that furnaces tend to fail after about 15 years, suggesting our 31.5-year-old furnace is staggeringly ancient. I figured a 1990 furnace would give a decent sense of the state of things circa 1997, since it was halfway through its life expectancy then.

>>#I don’t actually own a tent at present but yes if you have one even a tent not meant for cold weather stuff will do a lot

I didn’t actually *know* we owned a tent during the 16-hour outage, and Mom apparently didn’t think of it. Shit like this is why I want to inventory the basement and attic.

(she says she inherited it from a retiring Girl Scout leader, and never got a good opportunity to use it for our own troop)


Tags:

#reply via reblog #101 Uses for Infrastructureless Computers #domesticity

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rustingbridges:

ime one of the upsides of gas is that as long as you have gas or electric your home has heat and cooking capability

also I’ve never had a gas outage. presumably they run those underground? whereas I’ve lived in places where you were, at some point, definitely going to have the electric out for hours

 

brin-bellway:

…how is your heat set up? Is that from having a gas stove?

I have an electric stove and a gas furnace (also a gas dryer and water heater), and I would have said the exact opposite: one of the *downsides* of gas is that your heat needs *both* gas and electricity to work, and fails if either is missing.

(Not that gas has ever been missing, true, but “works when electricity is out” is like the *one* major advantage combustion-based heating can have, and it can’t even fucking do *that*. It had one job! What am I paying all this carbon for, if not that?!)

(I can*not* fucking wait to get a heat pump and some hybrid solar.)

 

rustingbridges:

huh, TIL. has this always been the case? most of my lengthy power outage memories occur the late 90s / early 00s and the furnace might have been old at the time.

maybe the kerosene space heater people are right after all

What am I paying all this carbon for, if not that?!

my understanding is that vs resistive heating you’re not paying carbon, since gas furnaces are extremely efficient. heat pumps can change this equation, yeah

My furnace is from 1990. I doubt it’s very efficient; it should, however, give pretty accurate results regarding “what things were like in the late 90s”.

We had a 16-hour power outage in late December a few years back, and it got pretty cold in the house. (Though the downward slope over time was shallower than I would have expected: I guess our insulation is better than I thought.)

I’m not sure what you mean about not paying carbon relative to–oh, are you assuming the electricity is *also* produced by burning gas? We’re mostly nuclear and hydro around here, though with a minority of natural gas.

>>maybe the kerosene space heater people are right after all

I’ve thought about it, but I’d rather not risk it. My current plan for extended cold-weather power outages is to set up a family-sized tent in my kitchen (the only large enough open space for it) and pile on the insulation.


Tags:

#reply via reblog #domesticity #101 Uses for Infrastructureless Computers


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rustingbridges:

ime one of the upsides of gas is that as long as you have gas or electric your home has heat and cooking capability

also I’ve never had a gas outage. presumably they run those underground? whereas I’ve lived in places where you were, at some point, definitely going to have the electric out for hours

…how is your heat set up? Is that from having a gas stove?

I have an electric stove and a gas furnace (also a gas dryer and water heater), and I would have said the exact opposite: one of the *downsides* of gas is that your heat needs *both* gas and electricity to work, and fails if either is missing.

(Not that gas has ever been missing, true, but “works when electricity is out” is like the *one* major advantage combustion-based heating can have, and it can’t even fucking do *that*. It had one job! What am I paying all this carbon for, if not that?!)

(I can*not* fucking wait to get a heat pump and some hybrid solar.)


Tags:

#disappointed permanent resident of The Future #reply via reblog #domesticity #101 Uses for Infrastructureless Computers


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etirabys:

One sensory superpower I think most humans have is that of being able to tell, without looking, whether a water glass they are filling is almost at the limit. Because the pitch changes. Isn’t that amazing?


Tags:

#I love doing that #domesticity #is the blue I see the same as the blue you see

swankyjami:

huffylemon:

ead346175c9030e1fc8b466216a672d56ab02eab

This is what happens when you’re still on tumblr as an adult, you start reblogging shit like this


Tags:

#what do you mean ”as an adult” #as a kid we went around at 2 AM and changed them together #as a teenager Dad *sometimes* did them and I–the earliest riser–went around in the morning and caught the ones he’d missed #(he tended to miss the thermostat) #these days it *is* entirely my job though #don’t forget the microwave! #Daylight Savings Time #domesticity